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this is more of a design issue question for character buffers. Typically, a lot of programs especially C programs according to C by Discovery 2nd edition deal with a lot of input and output of Strings. On chapter 5, Section 5.3, Page 255 for those that have the book the footnote on that page says:

"The size of a buffer is open to debate. Many programmers will go with an array of 80 cells since few users will type more than that. Others would go with the system limit on input lines."

Where can I find my system limit on input lines? I feel an 80 character buffer is too small a buffer. I need to be able to explain why I choose the size of my buffer in my program project, my professor will want to know a reason.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#define DEL 127

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){

    FILE *fpin = NULL;  //pointer to access open file.
    int iochar = 0; //temporary storage for characters taken from stdin or from a file.
    int edit = 1; //used to indicate an edit corresponding to (1)(2)(3)(4)
    char *inbuffer = malloc(80); //temporary storage to store characters taken from file or stdin
    int offset = 0;//places the character taken from file or stdin in correct location in allocated memory

    if (argc == 1){

        while ((iochar = getchar()) != EOF){
            if(offset > 80){
                printf("Error: Input size to big for this program.\n");
                printf("A line from your file is bigger than 80 characters.\n");
                return 0;
            }

            if((iochar<32 && iochar != 10) || iochar == 127){
                edit = 0;
                if(iochar == DEL){
                    *(inbuffer + offset++) = '^';
                    *(inbuffer + offset++) = '?';
                }
                else{
                    *(inbuffer + offset++) = '^';
                    *(inbuffer + offset++) = (iochar+64);
                }
            }
            else if(iochar > 127 && iochar < 80)
                edit = 0;
            else if(iochar > 31 && iochar < 127)
                *(inbuffer + offset++) = iochar;

            if(iochar == '\n'){
                *(inbuffer + offset++) = '$';
                int limit_char;
                if(offset > 72)
                    limit_char = offset-72; //if line is larger than 72 print last 72 characters in inbuffer
                else
                    limit_char = 0; //if line is smaller than 72, print whatever is in allocated memory inbuffer

                /*Printing out the characters in allocated memory*/
                *(inbuffer + offset) = 0;
                printf("%s",(inbuffer+limit_char));
                putchar('\n');
                offset = 0;
                }
            }
        return edit;
        }

    if (argc == 2){
        fpin = fopen(argv[1], "r");

        while ((iochar = getc(fpin)) != EOF){
            if(offset > 80){
                printf("Error: Input size to big for this program.\n");
                printf("A line from your file is bigger than 80 characters.\n");
                return 0;
            }

            if((iochar<32 && iochar != 10) || iochar == 127){
                edit = 0;
                if(iochar == DEL){
                    *(inbuffer + offset++) = '^';
                    *(inbuffer + offset++) = '?';
                }
                else{
                    *(inbuffer + offset++) = '^';
                    *(inbuffer + offset++) = (iochar+64);
                }
            }
            else if(iochar > DEL && iochar < 80)
                edit = 0;
            else if(iochar > 31 && iochar < DEL)
                *(inbuffer + offset++) = iochar;

            if(iochar == '\n'){
                *(inbuffer + offset++) = '$';
                int limit_char; //used to limit only 72 characters to be printed
                if(offset > 72)
                    limit_char = offset-72; //if line is larger than 72 print last 72 characters
                else
                    limit_char = 0; //if line is smaller than 72

                *(inbuffer + offset) = 0;
                printf("%s",(inbuffer+limit_char));
                putchar('\n');
                offset = 0;
                }
            }
        return edit;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
The correct answer to this depends on what you're trying to do, exactly. Can you show the code, with the buffer that you're trying to determine a fixed size for? –  Jonathon Reinhart Dec 2 '13 at 6:50
1  
Random pieces of advice: Unless you're using getline, which requires it, there's no need to malloc() your buffer. Just make it a static (global) buffer (i.e. char buf[WHATEVER];) –  Jonathon Reinhart Dec 2 '13 at 7:09
    
So there is my code. The program essentially takes either input from stdin or from a file and messes with the non-printables and any non ascii characters. It will also print out the last 72 characters of each line. Right now I have 80 bytes allocated. –  TwilightSparkleTheGeek Dec 2 '13 at 7:09
    
If this is homework, and the prof is providing the input file, I would think he would tell you what a reasonable buffer to allocate would be. Otherwise, just pick something "big" and go with it. A 4096-byte buffer is of no concern here. –  Jonathon Reinhart Dec 2 '13 at 7:10
1  
I typically use 4096 these days, partly for the shock value; BUFSIZ and LINE_MAX are semi-plausible alternatives. A big question is "what will happen to your program if it encounters a line that is N-3, N-2, N-1, N, N+1, N+2, N+3 characters long where your input buffer is N characters?" For some programs, there's no consequence; for others, lines will be miscalculated. You then have to decide whether it matters. Some JSON files are enormous and a single line at most (bookmarks files?). What types of 'text' file are you processing? –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 2 '13 at 7:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is <limits.h>, which defines (on UNIX-like platforms):

  • MAX_CANON - Maximum number of bytes in a terminal canonical input line.
  • MAX_INPUT - Minimum number of bytes for which space will be available in a terminal input queue; therefore, the maximum number of bytes a portable application may require to be typed as input before reading them.

  • LINE_MAX - Unless otherwise noted, the maximum length, in bytes, of a utility's input line (either standard input or another file), when the utility is described as processing text files. The length includes room for the trailing .

fgets suggests using LINE_MAX which is 2048 on my Fedora 17 box, and in Cygwin.

See also:

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jonathon, for answering. If I use malloc(MAX_INPUT) in my c program how many bytes will be allocated? My program is going to be fed a gedit file with large lines. –  TwilightSparkleTheGeek Dec 2 '13 at 6:51
1  
GCC on both Fedora 17 and Cygwin show 255 for both MAX_INPUT and MAX_CANON. However, if you're reading from a file, you theoretically shouldn't assume any maximum. –  Jonathon Reinhart Dec 2 '13 at 6:58
1  
In a modern POSIX environment, you can use getline(), which will malloc/realloc a buffer for you. Otherwise, maybe fscanf would better suit your needs, rather than reading the entire line into memory first? –  Jonathon Reinhart Dec 2 '13 at 6:59
    
I'll post my code. I just have to format it correctly. It's the first time I'm posting code on this website. –  TwilightSparkleTheGeek Dec 2 '13 at 7:00
    
Highlight it and click the code format button. It will indent four spaces for you, which makes it code formatted. –  Jonathon Reinhart Dec 2 '13 at 7:01

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