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First of all, I should state that this is a homework assignment, so while questions that give a direct answer will give me a good grade, I would prefer to know why something doesn't work, and a reason why/how I should fix it with your solution.

So here is the background for this function. I have a quarterback struct with the following information. There are ten games, which all are stored in the struct and its arrays:

struct QuarterBack{
    string name;
    int completions[kNumGames];
    int attempts[kNumGames];
    int yards[kNumGames];
    int touchdowns[kNumGames];
    int interceptions[kNumGames];
};

Now my goal for this problem is to use the information stored in these structs to compute the NFL Style passer ratings. For reference, wikipedia gives the following:

Passer Rating Information

So here is the code I am using. It has some excessive parenthesis that I was trying to use to make sure my control was correct, but other than that I am stumped as to why I am not getting more correct answers. Below the code I will post an example file and output.

/**
 * @brief printPasserRating prints the passer rating of all players
 * @param players is the array holding all the players
 */
void printPasserRating(QuarterBack *players, int numPlayers){
    for(int player = 0; player < numPlayers; player++){
        double passerRating = 0;

        int sumCompletions = 0, sumAttempts = 0, sumYards = 0,
                sumTouchdowns = 0, sumInterceptions = 0;


        for(int game = 0; game < kNumGames; game++){
            sumCompletions += players[player].completions[game];
            sumAttempts += players[player].attempts[game];
            sumYards += players[player].yards[game];
            sumTouchdowns += players[player].touchdowns[game];
            sumInterceptions += players[player].interceptions[game];
        }


        double a = 0, b = 0, c = 0, d = 0;
        double nums[4] = {a, b, c, d};


        nums[0] = static_cast<double>((sumCompletions / sumAttempts) - 0.3) * 5;
        nums[1] = static_cast<double>((sumYards / sumAttempts) - 3) * 0.25;
        nums[2] = static_cast<double>(sumTouchdowns / sumAttempts) * 20;
        nums[3] = 2.375 - (static_cast<double>(sumInterceptions / sumAttempts) * 25);


        for(int letter = 0; letter < 4; letter++){
            nums[letter] = mm(nums[letter]);
        }

        passerRating = (nums[0] + nums[1] + nums[2] + nums[3]) / 0.06;
        cout << players[player].name << "\t" << passerRating << endl;
    }

    showMenu(players, numPlayers);
}

Here is the example file. Ignore the 4, as it is for a separate part of the problem. Each row is a game, and it is listed as: completions, attempts, yards, touchdowns, then interceptions.

4
Peyton Manning              
27  42  462 7   0
30  43  307 2   0
32  37  374 3   0
28  34  327 4   0
33  42  414 4   1
28  42  295 2   1
29  49  386 3   1
30  44  354 4   3
25  36  330 4   0
24  40  323 1   0
Tom Brady               
29  52  288 2   1
19  39  185 1   0
25  36  225 2   1
20  31  316 2   0
18  38  197 0   1
25  43  269 1   1
22  46  228 0   1
13  22  116 1   1
23  33  432 4   0
29  40  296 1   1
Drew Brees              
26  35  357 2   1
26  46  322 1   2
29  46  342 3   1
30  39  413 4   0
29  35  288 2   0
17  36  236 2   1
26  34  332 5   0
30  51  382 2   2
34  41  392 4   0
30  43  305 1   1
Eli Manning             
24  35  360 1   2
25  46  340 2   3
26  44  350 3   1
34  35  460 1   2
25  36  240 2   3
16  34  250 3   1
24  35  360 1   0
35  56  340 2   2
36  44  350 3   0
34  45  360 1   1

And here is the output that the function is giving me: Code Results


Any help is much appreciated, and if you need more information to help me, feel free to comment and ask. Also, as this is a homework assignment, don't assume that I am just incompetent even if I make a silly mistake. I was told that Stack Overflow has no stupid questions, and I really hope that the community can live up to that.

Thanks in advanced.

share|improve this question
    
What do you expect the output to be? –  Joe Z Dec 2 '13 at 7:04
    
@JoeZ, while my teacher didn't give specific answers for the test case, he gave approximations closer to 100. Also, my last two answers shouldn't be the same. –  shermaza Dec 2 '13 at 7:07
    
Just a hint: You can use std::accumulate to do the summation: std::accumulate(players[player].completions, players[player].completions + kNumGames, 0). I also advice to prefer std::vecotr over arrays. –  Micha Wiedenmann Dec 2 '13 at 7:23
    
@MichaWiedenmann much appreciated for the accumulate advice. About the array, since this is an introductory programming class we haven't covered vectors yet, but I believe we will next term. Even my instructor says that he doesn't like Arrays, but since they exist he has to teach them to us. –  shermaza Dec 3 '13 at 4:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This math is unlikely to do what you want:

    nums[0] = static_cast<double>((sumCompletions / sumAttempts) - 0.3) * 5;
    nums[1] = static_cast<double>((sumYards / sumAttempts) - 3) * 0.25;
    nums[2] = static_cast<double>(sumTouchdowns / sumAttempts) * 20;
    nums[3] = 2.375 - (static_cast<double>(sumInterceptions / sumAttempts) * 25);

Where you've put the cast will cast the result of the division to be double after the division has been performed. But, the division itself will be an integer division.

You want something more like this:

    nums[0] = (static_cast<double>(sumCompletions) / sumAttempts - 0.3) * 5.0;
    nums[1] = (static_cast<double>(sumYards) / sumAttempts - 3) * 0.25;
    nums[2] = (static_cast<double>(sumTouchdowns) / sumAttempts) * 20.0;
    nums[3] = 2.375 - (static_cast<double>(sumInterceptions) / sumAttempts) * 25.0;

By casting one of the terms in the divide to double, the division itself upgrades to double.

Alternately, you could just declare all of these variables to be double and avoid the casts entirely. That would make the code much easier to follow. Or, just make sumAttempts into a double, as it is common to all of the four divides.

share|improve this answer
    
I make this mistake too frequently, and always miss it. Thanks for the heads up, I'm going to try it now. –  shermaza Dec 2 '13 at 7:08
    
Looks like that fixed my problem. Much appreciated! –  shermaza Dec 2 '13 at 7:10

I think the issue is in code like this:

static_cast<double>((sumCompletions / sumAttempts) - 0.3)

Here, sumCompletions and sumAttempts are ints. While you're trying to do a cast to a double to avoid integer division, the cast is on the complete value of the expression rather than on the numerator or denominator. This means that the division performed is integer division, which then has 0.3 subtracted and the result, which is already a double, is then cast to a double.

To fix this, cast the numerator or denominator, not the quotient itself:

static_cast<double>(sumCompletions) / sumAttempts - 0.3

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
While both answers are correct, Joez answered first, so I am going to give the correct answer to him. Thanks for the help though! Always nice to see helpful users doing what they do best. –  shermaza Dec 2 '13 at 7:11
2  
@zsherman- Perhaps I'm mistaken, but I think I answered before he did. :-) –  templatetypedef Dec 2 '13 at 7:12

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