Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm attempting to make a flush in a classic poker/card game type program. The property is the suit (hearts, diamonds, etc) and the array is the hand. I used the IEquatable and implemented the Equals method

    public bool Equals(SuperCard otherCard)
    {
        if (otherCard == null)
            return false;
        return (this.cardSuit.Equals(otherCard.cardSuit));
    }

from there in my Program.cs I am writing a bool method for Flush, using the .Equals. it was suggested to me that I use a for loop, but I'm having trouble understanding if I'm doing this right. I need to compare the cardSuit property, card by card. But I'm unsure of how to go about it. Any help would be appreciated. Here's what I have in the method so far.

    private static bool Flush(SuperCard[] hand)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < hand.Length; i++)
        {
            if (hand[i].Equals(hand[i + 1]) == false)
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return hand[hand.Length].Equals(hand[hand.Length - 1]);
    }

in my mind, the for loop compares each card looking for any false's, then returns false if so. outside/after the for loop (supposing theyre all true), I return the true/false of the comparison of the last 2 cards in the the hand. am i over complicating it? is it wrong?

EDIT: I can see this: "if (hand[i].Equals(hand[i + 1]) == false)" will go out of bounds exception, so I need a new way of comparing card to card. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
1  
hand[hand.Length] raise exception –  Grundy Dec 2 '13 at 8:39
    
try for (int i = 0; i < hand.Length-1; i++) –  Grundy Dec 2 '13 at 8:40
    
yeah I caught that right after I posted. thanks @Grundy –  jacksonSD Dec 2 '13 at 8:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, beware of (possible) stack overflow:

public bool Equals(SuperCard otherCard)
{
    // "otherCard == null" usually calls "Equals" method which in turn 
    // calls "Equals" again and again...
    if (Object.ReferenceEquals(otherCard, null)) // <- No "==" or "Equal" - just reference test
        return false;

    return (this.cardSuit.Equals(otherCard.cardSuit));
}

Another issue is RangeCheckError (see at "Length - 1" in the loop condition)

private static bool Flush(SuperCard[] hand)
{
    if (Object.ReferenceEquals(null, hand))
      return false;

    for (int i = 0; i < hand.Length - 1; i++) // <- Pay attention to "Length - 1"
    {
        if (!hand[i].Equals(hand[i + 1]))     // <- "== false" is quite awkward
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    // You don't need any additional checks here:
    // A[0] = A[1] = ... = A[length - 1]
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer

There's a much easier way to do this

private static bool Flush(SuperCard[] hand)
{
    if(hand.Length == 0)
       return false;
    var suit = hand[0].cardSuit;
    return hand.All(c => c.cardSuit == suit);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.