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I have successfully implemented Rob Napier's AES encryption method for iOS in one of my apps. I would now like to be able to encrypt and decrypt files from that app with my JavaScript implementation. I am using FileReader to get a local from from the user and loading it with

reader.readAsArrayBuffer(file);

When this is done the file gets encrypted using the Stanford JavaScript Crypto Library and finally the encrypted file can be downloaded:

reader.onloadend = function(e) {

    var content = new Uint8Array(e.target.result);
    var utf8 = "";
    for (var i = 0, len = content.length; i < len; i++) {
         utf8 += String.fromCharCode(content[i]);
    }
    var b64 = btoa(utf8);

    //we finally encrypt it 
    var encrypted = sjcl.encrypt(password, b64,{ks:256});
    var json = JSON.parse(encrypted);
    var ciphertext = json.ct;

    a.attr('href', 'data:application/octet-stream,' + ciphertext);
    a.attr('download', file.name + '.encrypted');

    step(4);

    };

reader.readAsArrayBuffer(file);

The problem is that the encrypted file is much larger than the original. This is not the case in my iOS implementation which works just fine. And of course it can't be decrypted without error. In fact the resulting file will have 0 bytes of size.

I am hoping someone can point out the error in my code to me. That would really be great.

@Duncan:

Thank you. I looked into that but I'm not really sure about all the steps I have to take. Especially what they mean in code. Maybe somebody could help me out here. Thanks a lot!

Encryption

  1. Generate a random encryption salt
  2. Generate the encryption key using PBKDF2 (see your language docs for how to call this). Pass the password as a string, the random encryption salt, and 10,000 iterations.
  3. Generate a random HMAC salt
  4. Generate the HMAC key using PBKDF2 (see your language docs for how to call this). Pass the password as a string, the random HMAC salt, and 10,000 iterations.
  5. Generate a random IV
  6. Encrypt the data using the encryption key (above), the IV (above), AES-256, and the CBC mode. This is the default mode for almost all AES encryption libraries.
  7. Pass your header and ciphertext to an HMAC function, along with the HMAC key (above), and the PRF "SHA-256" (see your library's docs for what the names of the PRF functions are; this might also be called "SHA-2, 256-bits").
  8. Put these elements together in the format given above.
share|improve this question
    
RNCryptor uses a special format for its input and output. You will need to take this into account when trying to integrate with some JavaScript code. –  Duncan Dec 2 '13 at 11:01
1  
I have started work on a JavaScript implementation of the RNCryptor format (it will show up at github.com/RNCryptor when ready). JavaScript is far too slow to handle the default RNCryptor settings. You must reduce the number of PBKDF2 iterations or it will take several minutes to encrypt or decrypt data, even on a desktop browser (I shudder to think what it would take to compute on a mobile device). –  Rob Napier Jan 8 at 17:45
    
Thats really wonderful to hear. Thanks a lot in advance. That will be really cool to have. –  freshking Jan 9 at 13:29

1 Answer 1

Encrypt the data using the encryption key (above), the IV (above), AES-256, and the CBC mode. This is the default mode for almost all AES encryption libraries.

This is a false assumption, according to this sjcl uses ccm as a default mode.

share|improve this answer
    
I was wondering this myself. Maybe it would be possible with CryptoJS? –  freshking Dec 3 '13 at 13:06
    
@freshking Im not sure what you mean, you can use sjcl in cbc mode it's just not the default mode. Use: sjcl.encrypt(password, b64,{ks:256, mode:'ccm'}) But beware that there might be other differences in the config so check the link i gave. –  erdeszt Dec 3 '13 at 13:09
    
I just read up on CBC mode in SCJL and it does not seem to be working: cryptojs.altervista.org/secretkey/doc/doc_aes_stanford.html –  freshking Dec 3 '13 at 14:19
    
You're right, it's completely missing from sjcl, my bad. Maybe you can try cryptojs but i'm not familiar with that. –  erdeszt Dec 3 '13 at 14:44
    
does SJCL supports EBC mode? –  akshay Jun 2 at 13:16

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