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I'm representing basic blocks of code and the control flow between them as a cyclic graph and want to be able to serialize the graph to XML or similar and then deserialize it and use the graph in another application. When attempting to serialize the data structure I get thousands of calls to the serialization function even though the graph I'm using to test the application contains less than fifty nodes which leads me to believe there is a problem with cyclic references.

When I run or debug the application it successfully enters the void serialize(Archive&, std::vector<BasicBlock*>&, const unsigned) function repeatedly until it crashes with a segmentation fault. The output file is created but nothing is written to it.

The following is the data structure I am using to represent the basic blocks;

struct __attribute__ ((visibility ("default"))) BasicBlock {
    unsigned int id;
    unsigned int start_address;
    unsigned int end_address;
    std::vector<BasicBlock*>* outgoing;
    std::vector<BasicBlock*>* incoming;
};

and this is the serialization class and functions

class Serialize {
public:

    static void marshal(const std::vector<BasicBlock*>& basic_blocks, std::string filename) {
        std::ofstream ofstream(filename.c_str(), std::ios::out | std::ios::binary);
        boost::archive::text_oarchive archive(ofstream);
        archive << basic_blocks;
    }

    static void unmarshal(const std::string filename, std::vector<BasicBlock*>& basic_blocks) {
        std::ifstream ifstream(filename.c_str());
        boost::archive::text_iarchive archive(ifstream);
        archive >> basic_blocks;
    }

};

namespace boost {
    namespace serialization {

    template<class Archive>
    void save(Archive & archive, const BasicBlock& basic_block, const unsigned int version) {
        archive & basic_block.id;
        archive & basic_block.start_address;
        archive & basic_block.end_address;
        archive & basic_block.incoming;
        archive & basic_block.outgoing;
    }

    template<class Archive>
    void load(Archive & archive, BasicBlock& basic_block, const unsigned int version) {
        archive & basic_block.id;
        archive & basic_block.start_address;
        archive & basic_block.end_address;
        archive & basic_block.incoming;
        archive & basic_block.outgoing;
    }

    template<typename Archive>
    void serialize(Archive& archive, std::vector<BasicBlock>& basic_blocks, const unsigned version) {
        archive & basic_blocks;
    }

    template<typename Archive>
    void serialize(Archive& archive, std::vector<BasicBlock*>& basic_blocks, const unsigned version) {
        archive & basic_blocks; // Triggered thousands of times...
    }

    }
}

BOOST_SERIALIZATION_SPLIT_FREE(BasicBlock)
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

My first suspicion is, the 'save' overloads for vectors actually ruin things for you.

template<typename Archive>
    void serialize(Archive& archive, std::vector<BasicBlock*>& basic_blocks, const unsigned version) {
        archive & basic_blocks; // Triggered thousands of times...
    }

would... (indirectly) recursively call itself AFAICT

Did you try including boost/serialization/vector.hpp?

Here's a SSCCE that shows it working: See it Live on Coliru

#include <boost/serialization/vector.hpp>
#include <boost/archive/text_oarchive.hpp>
#include <boost/archive/text_iarchive.hpp>
#include <vector>
#include <fstream>

struct BasicBlock {
    unsigned int id;
    unsigned int start_address;
    unsigned int end_address;
    std::vector<BasicBlock*>* outgoing;
    std::vector<BasicBlock*>* incoming;
};

// BOOST_CLASS_TRACKING(BasicBlock, boost::serialization::track_always)

namespace boost {
    namespace serialization {
        template<class Archive>
            void save(Archive & archive, const BasicBlock& basic_block, const unsigned int version) {
                archive & basic_block.id;
                archive & basic_block.start_address;
                archive & basic_block.end_address;
                archive & basic_block.incoming;
                archive & basic_block.outgoing;
            }

        template<class Archive>
            void load(Archive & archive, BasicBlock& basic_block, const unsigned int version) {
                archive & basic_block.id;
                archive & basic_block.start_address;
                archive & basic_block.end_address;
                archive & basic_block.incoming;
                archive & basic_block.outgoing;
            }
    }
}

BOOST_SERIALIZATION_SPLIT_FREE(BasicBlock)

int main()
{
    BasicBlock root
    {
        1, 2, 3,
        new std::vector<BasicBlock*> { new BasicBlock { 4, 5, 6, nullptr, nullptr } },
        new std::vector<BasicBlock*> { &root } // cyclic!
    };

    boost::archive::text_oarchive ar(std::cout);
    ar << root;

    // everything leaked :)
}
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1  
You were right, thank you so much. It gets a little problematic when you (me) include a huge framework in a project and just accepts all the magical things that is suddenly provided.. Don't think I would have ever figured out that it was a recursive call on my own. – Jakob Pogulis Dec 2 '13 at 12:50

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