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Main context works in main queue, separate operation works in separate thread and context initialized with private queue. All works great as it should, but one little problem happened.

I found sometimes when I delete records from background thread I got exception about access to fault object inside FRC. Seems that when FRC processes entries that it got and background thread deletes the same objects, this situation happens.

What should I do to prevent exception happening ? One solution that I see, is to use special property on managed object to indicate that it is (object) deleted. Or maybe I should somehow tell the background task not no delete entries until FRC finishes it work.

Edited: My code subscribed with NSManagedObjectContextDidSaveNotification. Destination SDK: iOS 7

MainContext:

- (NSManagedObjectContext *)mainManagedObjectContext
{
if (_mainManagedObjectContext != nil) {
    return _mainManagedObjectContext;
}

_mainManagedObjectContext = [[NSManagedObjectContext alloc] initWithConcurrencyType:NSMainQueueConcurrencyType];
_mainManagedObjectContext.persistentStoreCoordinator = [self persistentStoreCoordinator];
return _mainManagedObjectContext;
}

Background context:

- (NSManagedObjectContext*)newPrivateContext
{
    NSManagedObjectContext* context = [[NSManagedObjectContext alloc] initWithConcurrencyType:NSPrivateQueueConcurrencyType];
    context.persistentStoreCoordinator = self.persistentStoreCoordinator;
    return context;
}
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can you show how you are constructing main context and worker context - i.e parent-child or observation of NSManagedObjectContextDidSaveNotification. And are you expecting this to work on iOS5? –  Warren Burton Dec 2 '13 at 10:26
    
Entry updated... –  dmitrynikolaev Dec 2 '13 at 10:56

1 Answer 1

Or maybe I should somehow tell the background task not no delete entries until FRC finishes its work.

Thats stinky code. The background thread doesn't need to know what the controller is up to.

A more modern pattern for this is

- (NSManagedObjectContext*)newPrivateContext
{
    NSManagedObjectContext* context = [[NSManagedObjectContext alloc] initWithConcurrencyType:NSPrivateQueueConcurrencyType];
    context.parent = self.mainManagedObjectContext;
    return context;
}

and then...

NSManagedObjectContext *workerContext = [self newPrivateContext];

[workerContext performBlock:^{

    //stuff to be done on the background thread

    NSError *error = NULL;
    if ([context save:&error]) {
        //handle error
    }

}];

The work will be done on a background thread and you can remove the observation of NSManagedObjectContextDidSaveNotification since establishing a parent-child relationship between the two contexts handles that automagically.

Whether that is whole of your problem is not certain but using NSManagedObjectContextDidSaveNotification can result in odd conditions if you are not doing it exactly right.

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