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I am writing a password-reset page for my website. Here's my idea:

a. User click the "forgot password" link on the login page

b. Redirect to my password-reset page

c. User enter his email address

d. A email message sent to the email address with the link to reset his/her password. The link has security code like ?code="xxxx" in it.

e. User open the link and enter new password, and then click the submit button.

f. My page change user's password.

My question is for step f. In step e, when user opened the link, I could verify his security code and then show the 'new password' and the 'confirm password' fields to user. But when the user clicked the submit button, how could I know this is a real request submited by the user instead of a hacker? Maybe I am wrong, but I think hacker can easily simulate such field data, since there is no validation fields.

There are some idea I can think of to validate the request in step f, but I don't know whether they are right. 1. Add a encrypted cookie in step e and check it in step f? 2. Use a session variable in step e and check it in step f? 3. Add a hidden field in step e and check it in step f?

Are those approaches ok? Which one is better, or is there any better one?

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A user entering their username and reset code should log them into the site just as their username and password would. The difference is you then immediately force them to change their password. With this password reset method you're implicitly trusting that the user is the owner of the email account where the code was sent.

Edit:

Ok, so I don't know the first thing about ASP.net.

However, I've handled this problem many times before. Here is a solution of mine in PHP:

<?php
class AuthController extends Zend_Controller_Action
{
    public function identifyAction()
    {
        if ($this->_request->isPost()) {
            $username = $this->_getParam('username');
            $password = $this->_getParam('password');

            if (empty($username) || empty($password)) {
                $this->_flashError('Username or password cannot be blank.');
            } else {
                $user = new User();
                $result = $user->login($username, $password);

                if ($result->isValid()) {
                    $user->fromArray((array) $this->_auth->getIdentity());

                    if ($this->_getParam('changepass') || $user->is_password_expired) {
                        $this->_redirect('auth/change-password');
                        return;
                    }
                    $this->_doRedirect($user);
                    return;
                } else {
                    $this->_doFailure($result->getIdentity());
                }
            }
        }
        $this->_redirect('/');
    }

    public function forgotPasswordAction()
    {
        if ($this->_request->isPost()) {
            // Pseudo-random uppercase 6 digit hex value
            $resetCode = strtoupper(substr(sha1(uniqid(rand(),true)),0,6));

            Doctrine_Query::create()
                ->update('dUser u')
                ->set('u.reset_code', '?', array($resetCode))
                ->where('u.username = ?', array($this->_getParam('username')))
                ->execute();

            $mail = new Zend_Mail();
            $mail->setBodyText($this->_resetEmailBody($this->_getParam('username'), $resetCode));
            $mail->setFrom('no-reply@example.com', 'Example');
            $mail->addTo($this->_getParam('username'));
            $mail->setSubject('Forgotten Password Request');
            $mail->send();


            $this->_flashNotice("Password reset request received.");
            $this->_flashNotice("An email with further instructions, including your <em>Reset Code</em>, has been sent to {$this->_getParam('username')}.");
            $this->_redirect("auth/reset-password/username/{$this->_getParam('username')}");
        }
    }

    public function resetPasswordAction()
    {
        $this->view->username = $this->_getParam('username');
        $this->view->reset_code = $this->_getParam('reset_code');

        if ($this->_request->isPost()) {
            $formData = $this->_request->getParams();
            if (empty($formData['username']) || empty($formData['reset_code'])) {
                $this->_flashError('Username or reset code cannot be blank.');
                $this->_redirect('auth/reset-password');
            } elseif ($formData['new_password'] !== $formData['confirm_password']) {
                $this->_flashError('Password and confirmation do not match.');
                $this->_redirect('auth/reset-password');
            } else {
                $user = new User();
                $result = $user->loginWithResetCode($formData['username'], $formData['reset_code']);

                if ($result->isValid()) {
                    $user->updatePassword($result->getIdentity(), $formData['new_password']);

                    $user->fromArray((array) $this->_auth->getIdentity());
                    $this->_setLegacySessionData($user);

                    $this->_flashNotice('Password updated successfully!');
                    $this->_doRedirect($user);
                } else {
                    $this->_doFailure($result->getIdentity());
                    $this->_redirect('auth/reset-password');
                }
            }
        }
    }

    protected function _doFailure($username)
    {
        $user = Query::create()
            ->from('User u')
            ->select('u.is_locked')
            ->where('u.username = ?', array($username))
            ->fetchOne();

        if ($user->is_locked) {
            $lockedMessage = Config::get('auth.lock_message');
            if (!$lockedMessage) {
                $lockedMessage = 'This account has been locked.';
            }
            $this->_flashError($lockedMessage);
        } else {
            $this->_flashError('Invalid username or password');
        }
    }
}

If you can follow this, it should give you a good idea of what to do. I'll try to summarize:

identifyAction

This is the regular "login" using username and password. It logs the user in and stores their identity in the session.

forgotPasswordAction

This presents the user with a form requesting their username. After entering their username a reset code is generated, stored in their entry in the user table, and they are emailed as well as redirected to the reset password page. This page is unauthenticated, the user is not logged in.

resetPasswordAction

This is where the user is presented with the "resetPassword" form. They must provide their username and the reset code they received via email. This authenticates the user with the given username and reset code, just as if the reset code were a password. If the credentials are valid the user is then redirected to the changePassword action where they are permitted to change their password. The changePasswordAction (not shown) requires the user be authenticated (logged in) either via username/password or username/resetCode

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
But I checked serverl sites and found that they won't logging users in when recover their passwords. The two password fields are only for resetting password, not changing password. –  wenqiang Jan 9 '10 at 8:45
    
I don't see the relevance your comment has to my answer. –  hobodave Jan 9 '10 at 8:51
    
I mean on serveral websites, users entering their username and reset code won't log them in. It just direct the users to a page to change their passwords, but they are not logged in. –  wenqiang Jan 9 '10 at 9:00
    
hobodave, thanks for your codes and summarize. They helps a lot. But I think the codes still logs users when recovering their passwords. Why not, I will try to approach. Thanks. –  wenqiang Jan 9 '10 at 9:58

If your code that you're emailing is a GUID or some such ID, there is a statistically low chance that someone can guess that code. If you additionally had the link include a hashed version of their email or some other way of linking the code to the user, I think you'd be pretty well safe from malicious input.

I'd be more worried about people being spammed from step c/d, unless you're doing some sort of verification of the email existing currently in your database.

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Search for other questions on StackOverflow with the forgot-password tag. There are already several well written answers on good algorithms and techniques to use.

share|improve this answer
    
I have read all those questions. It seems that they are all focused on the ideas (like my steps), none of them are focused on this particular verfication. –  wenqiang Jan 9 '10 at 8:42

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