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I tried various implementations of the following algorithm but always ended up with a crash after a while the program runs...

I have a base object

class Element
    {
    public:
        int a;
        float p;
        Element(int _a, float _p=1.0): a(_a), p(_p){};
    };

of which I create a vector and include in a Buffer object.

class Buffer
    {
    public:
        Buffer(){};

        vector<Element> raw;       
        vector<Element> optimised; // DATA CALCULATED BASED ON RAW

        void addElement(int _a,float _p=1.0) // FILL THE RAW BUFFER
        {
            raw.push_back(Element(_a,_p));
        }

        void compute()  // COMPUTE THE OPTIMISED BUFFER
        {
            float t;
            int i;
            for(std::vector<Element>::iterator it = raw.begin(); it != raw.end(); ++it) 
            {
                optimised.push_back(Element(it->a,it->p));
                // DO SOME COMPUTATIONALLY INTENSIVE CALCULATIONS
                for(i=1; i<9999999; i++)
                    t = 9./i;
            }
        };

        void clear() // ERASE BOTH BUFFERS
        {
            raw.clear();
            optimised.clear();
        }
    };

I have a declaration of a single Buffer object - responsible for capturing the current data stream - and a vector of Buffer objects - behaving like a history/queue of the previously created buffers.

Buffer buffer;
vector<Buffer> queue;

The main thread is responsible of filling the buffer object and - once a series is complete - submit the buffer into the queue. As soon as a new buffer is added to the queue a Compute() function is called on a separate thread to analyse the recently submitted data.

//ADD THE CURRENT BUFFER TO THE QUEUE
queue.push_back(buffer);

//RUN 'COMPUTE' IN PARALLEL/BACKGROUND ON THE LAST SUBMITTED BUFFER
std::thread t(&Buffer::compute, &queue.back());
t.detach();

//CLEAR THE BUFFER, READY FOR A NEW SERIES
buffer.clear();

The program complies fine and launches but it crashes during execution (sometimes after just one buffer is submitted, sometimes after a few... it generally 'works for longer' if there is only one buffer at a time in the queue).

Do I need to use mutex locks in this situation ? If so, where ?

Do you have any suggestion on how to optimise the collection of the data (fill the 'buffer' object and submit it into the queue) - I think AddElement() is a bit unnecessarily expensive ?

ANY HELP APPRECIATED!

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
You don't appear to perform any synchronization whatsoever. Why not? –  David Heffernan Dec 2 '13 at 12:14
    
@DavidHeffernan The OP's asking if this will be necessary. The answer is definitely Yes! –  πάντα ῥεῖ Dec 2 '13 at 12:16
    
can you give me a suggestion on the kind of synchronisation I need to do? I've been trying using mutex but I still had the crashes - unless there is only one buffer/thread being computed at a time. I thought I didnt need to lock() since there's no data being shared between the threads (I copy the buffer into queue). I need this algorithm to be VERY efficient and fluid... –  mαττjαĸøb Dec 2 '13 at 12:19
    
Move it into the queue and create another one? –  Martin James Dec 2 '13 at 12:22
1  
When you store copies, adding to the queue may delete objects in the list and make copies. So taking the address of an element is dangerous. Any modification of the container invalidates that address. It's also hugely wasteful to perform copies on these objects. You've stuffed them full of data. You don't want to be copying that when you don't need to. –  David Heffernan Dec 2 '13 at 12:32

1 Answer 1

The problem is with &queue[last]. That gives you a pointer to where the vector currently stores the buffer. If vector reallocates (push_back can do that), then the pointer is invalid.

There are a few solutions to this:

  • Store pointer in the queue vector. Something like vector<unique_ptr<Buffer>> queue will work (and makes sure you don't accidentally leak the memory).
  • Use a datastructure that will not invalidate invalidate the pointers when modified. list and deque will work.
  • Make sure the vector doesn't reallocate. You can do a resize(x) initially, and then keep track of the last yourself.

Update: Add a code sample. This compiles and runs fine on Coliru (http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/)

#include <memory>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
class Buffer {};

int main()
{
    std::unique_ptr<Buffer> buffer {new Buffer()};
    std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Buffer>> queue;
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        buffer.reset(new Buffer());
        // Do things to buffer;
        queue.push_back(move(buffer));
    }
    std::cout << queue.size() << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
cheers.. umh how I can I then add 'buffer' (which is of type Buffer) to 'queue' (which is of type unique_ptr<Buffer>) ? –  mαττjαĸøb Dec 2 '13 at 12:33
2  
buffer will have to be a pointer as well. You can use unique_ptr<Buffer> buffer {new Buffer() }; and then queue.push_back(move(buffer));. –  Sorin Dec 2 '13 at 12:37
    
@Sorin.. Hmm.. after you move the unique_ptr, can you reseat it and so make another new one? –  Martin James Dec 2 '13 at 12:41
1  
@mαττjαĸøb I've updated the answer with a more complete sample. As long as you don't touch the same data from multiple threads you don't need a mutex. –  Sorin Dec 3 '13 at 12:02
1  
use queue.back().get(). That will give you the pointer, as you had before. @mαττjαĸøb –  Sorin Dec 3 '13 at 19:31

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