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I have noticed a programming style in Embedded C, used for firmware programming:

#define WRITE_REGISTER(reg, value) \
        do { \
           write_to_register(reg, value); \
        } while (0)

How does this do...while (0) help over:

#define WRITE_REGISTER(reg, value) write_to_register(reg, value)
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marked as duplicate by unwind, Dennis Meng, CDub, TheHippo, SchmitzIT Dec 2 '13 at 20:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
This is the best thread I've found regarding the do-while macro. Hope it helps, not sure if it will. stackoverflow.com/questions/154136/… –  Guy Kogus Dec 2 '13 at 14:07

2 Answers 2

As you can see here the do {} while(0) permits to avoid compilation errors or bad working when there are multiple lines in the macro and you try to call the macro in the same way as a c function (which is the way everyone does).

As an example (I report the one in the link here so you don't need to navigate the page)

#define DO_SOMETHING_HERE(_x) foo(_x); bar(_x);

if( condition )
    DO_SOMETHING_HERE(_x);
else
    ...

will generate a compilation error because it will result in:

if( condition )
    foo(_x); bar(_x);;
else
    ...

Using the do while everything will work fine, infact it will be:

#define DO_SOMETHING_HERE(_x) do{ foo(_x); bar(_x); }while(0) 
if( condition )
   do{ foo(_x); bar(_x); } while(0);
else
   ...

Note that in this case putting braces will not save you because:

#define DO_SOMETHING_HERE(_x) { foo(_x); bar(_x); } 
if( condition )
   { foo(_x); bar(_x); };
else
  ...

still generates an error.

In your case I think it's only a coding style because there's one line only.

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With this kind of loop definition, you can use break statements within. This allows easier error handling. Example:

do
{
    /* A lot of code */

    if(error)
        break;

    /* A lot of code */
{
while(0)
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