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I am trying to find the color that most suits a loaded image and apply it in the background. To adapt to the image and make the UI feel more natural. i have so far found 2 schemes :

1> averaging the pixels(Code Below) :

final Color acclimatizeAverage(BufferedImage img) {
        long avgr = 0, avgb = 0, avgg = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < img.getWidth(); i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < img.getHeight(); j++) {
               Color c = new Color(img.getRGB(i, j));
               avgr += c.getRed(); avgb += c.getBlue(); avgg += c.getGreen();
            }
        }
        avgr = (avgr/(img.getHeight()*img.getWidth()));
        avgg = (avgg/(img.getHeight()*img.getWidth()));
        avgb = (avgb/(img.getHeight()*img.getWidth()));
        Color c = new Color((int)avgr, (int)avgg, (int)avgb);
        return c;
    }

2> Grouping the pixels into fixed bins of Colors(Code Below) :

 Map<Color, Integer> createBins() {
        Map<Color, Integer> bins = new HashMap<>();
        bins.put(Color.red, 0);
        bins.put(Color.magenta, 0);
        bins.put(Color.orange, 0);
        bins.put(Color.PINK, 0);
        bins.put(Color.yellow, 0);
        bins.put(Color.LIGHT_GRAY, 0);
        bins.put(Color.GREEN, 0);
        bins.put(Color.GRAY, 0);
        bins.put(Color.DARK_GRAY, 0);
        bins.put(Color.CYAN, 0);
        bins.put(Color.BLUE, 0);
        bins.put(Color.BLACK, 0);
        return bins;
    }

    int compare(Color a, Color b) {
        return (int)Math.sqrt((a.getRed() - b.getRed())*(a.getRed() - b.getRed()) 
                + (a.getBlue() - b.getBlue())*(a.getBlue() - b.getBlue()) 
                + (a.getGreen()- b.getGreen())*(a.getGreen()- b.getGreen()));
    }

    BufferedImage acclimatizeGrouping(BufferedImage img) {
        Map<Color, Integer> bins = createBins();
        for (int i = 0; i < img.getWidth(); i++) {
            int min = Integer.MAX_VALUE; Color minC = null;
            for (int j = 0; j < img.getHeight(); j++) {
               Color c = new Color(img.getRGB(i, j));
                for (Map.Entry<Color, Integer> entry : bins.entrySet()) {
                    Integer integer = compare(entry.getKey(), c);
                    if(integer < min) {
                        min = integer;
                        minC = entry.getKey();
                    }
                }
                bins.put(minC, bins.get(minC)+1);
            }
        }
        int max = -1, n = 1; Color c = null;
        for (Map.Entry<Color, Integer> entry : bins.entrySet()) {
            Integer integer = entry.getValue();
            if(integer > max) {
                max = integer;
                c = entry.getKey();
            }
        }
        return c;
    }

But the grouping is producing weird results....
left side is the Color produced as a result of grouping and right side is image
Why is it producing such results ??? left side is the Color produced as a result of grouping and right side is image

averaing is producing more correct results : enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
1) For better help sooner, post an SSCCE. 2) There is no '?' in that mess of words. If you have a question, please add it, and slap a '?' on the end. –  Andrew Thompson Dec 2 '13 at 14:27

2 Answers 2

I think the problem is that RGB is not human euclidean space. You use euclidean distance to compare colors, but it is not good for human color sense. See this link for more information.

EDIT: More precise, you should use this algorithm:

typedef struct {
   unsigned char r, g, b;
} RGB;

double ColourDistance(RGB e1, RGB e2)
{
  long rmean = ( (long)e1.r + (long)e2.r ) / 2;
  long r = (long)e1.r - (long)e2.r;
  long g = (long)e1.g - (long)e2.g;
  long b = (long)e1.b - (long)e2.b;
  return sqrt((((512+rmean)*r*r)>>8) + 4*g*g + (((767-rmean)*b*b)>>8));
}
share|improve this answer
    
used it not much difference. I think i have to increase the bins... –  Tamojit Chatterjee Dec 2 '13 at 16:41
1  
yes, I think this is good idea. But I definitely recommend to use above algorithm (I had similar problem and this algorithm works better than euclidean distance). –  Arek Woźniak Dec 2 '13 at 17:11

This issue is, your compare(Color a, Color b) method is not implemented correctly and can use some basic refactoring using the Math.pow() method.

The basic formula to find similar colors programatically is

((r2 - r1)2 + (g2 - g1)2 + (b2 - b1)2)1/2

Applied to Java, that results in the modified compare(Color a, Color b)

int compare(Color a, Color b){
  return Math.sqrt(( Math.pow( b.getRed() - a.getRed() ) 
                   + ( Math.pow( b.getGreen() - a.getGreen() )
                   + ( Math.pow( b.getBlue() - a.getBlue() ));
}
share|improve this answer
    
how is it making a difference..... –  Tamojit Chatterjee Dec 2 '13 at 15:21
    
Order of operations, values, ect. Same thing with physics and math formulas. If you try to find the rate of change of an object but flip the locations, you're going to get incorrect results. –  Jason Dec 2 '13 at 15:29
1  
Buddy, I hope u noticed that it is getting squared and we know that, (a-b)^2 == (b-a)^2 –  Tamojit Chatterjee Dec 2 '13 at 15:49

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