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This is a very basic question, but what's the best way of writing a FORELSE into an implicit cursor in Oracle PL/SQL? Some programming languages permit this kind of syntax, executing the FORELSE block when the cursor returns no rows.

What I want to achieve is something along the following lines (pseudo-code):

DECLARE
    CURSOR test_cur IS
        SELECT 'a'
        FROM   table_with_zero_or_more_data;
BEGIN
    FOR r_ IN test_cur LOOP
        Dbms_Output.Put_Line ('One extra row found');
    FORELSE
        Dbms_Output.Put_Line ('No data found');
    END LOOP;
END;

I've tried using exceptions as follows, but the NO_DATA_FOUND exception doesn't get triggered by an implicit cursor.

DECLARE 
    CURSOR test_cur IS
        SELECT 'a'
        FROM   table_with_zero_or_more_data;
BEGIN
    BEGIN
        FOR r_ IN test_cur LOOP
            Dbms_Output.Put_Line ('One extra row found');
        END LOOP;
    EXCEPTION
        WHEN NO_DATA_FOUND THEN
            Dbms_Output.Put_Line ('No data found');
    END;
END;

The following does work of course (and there are similar variations, I have no doubt). But I just find this way a bit clunky. When the code becomes somewhat more real-life and verbose, it's not so obvious/intuitive that the IF statement is linked to the FOR loop. It also forces the introduction of a dummy variable, and just isn't syntactically beautiful.

DECLARE 
    CURSOR test_cur IS
        SELECT 'a'
        FROM   table_with_zero_or_more_data;
    i NUMBER := 0;
BEGIN
    FOR r_ IN test_cur LOOP
        i := i + 1;
        Dbms_Output.Put_Line ('One extra row found');
    END LOOP;
    IF i = 0 THEN
        Dbms_Output.Put_Line ('No data found');
    END IF;
END;

I just wonder if there's a better way, which is more intuitive and integrates the FOR and IF conditions?

EDIT

In case I wasn't clear enough, the point of this is to do it inside an IMPLICIT cursor. I know I can use EXplicit cursors and check for %NOTFOUND etc. (actually %ROWCOUNT is better).

share|improve this question
1  
When you use a cursor for loop, the no_data_found exception will never be raised if an explicit or implicit cursor is empty - it will be implicitly opened and implicitly closed, that's it. What you are trying to achieve is a bit vague, thought. Do you want to print the no data found message only when a cursor is opened for a query that returns no rows, and in that situation only? the point of this is to do it inside an IMPLICIT cursor. Probably you meant to say inside an explicit cursor for loop(you have your cursor explicitly defined). If so, then you wont be able to achieve this. – Nicholas Krasnov Dec 2 '13 at 20:44
up vote 2 down vote accepted

AFAIK because PL/SQL is missing forelse construct and there is no way to roll your own constructs the best you can hope for is using an extra state variable to cater the case the implicit cursor for-loop processed no rows.

However you can structure your code such a way it's more obvious what is happening:

declare
  cursor test_c is
    with data_ as (
      select 1 as id, 'foo' as str from dual union all
      select 2 as id, 'bar' as str from dual
    )
    select str from data_ where id > 2;

  -- isolate the data processing into a dedicated subroutine/package
  -- pass all required information as parameters
  procedure process_data(p_data in test_c%rowtype) is
  begin
    dbms_output.put_line('processing: ' || p_data.str);
  end;
begin
  -- more things can take place here ...

  -- isolate the data processing into a dedicated block or subroutine
  -- with a block level comment like: processing all foos and bars to
  -- conform business rule car. (or even better: name the subroutine 
  -- accordingly !)
  declare
    v_has_data boolean := false;
  begin
    for d in test_c loop
      v_has_data := true;
      process_data(d);
    end loop;

    if not v_has_data then
      dbms_output.put_line('no data processed');
    end if;
  end;

  -- more things can take place here ...
end;
/

Even I pretty much agree about the err ... clunkiness of this approach remember that all programming languages have trade-offs.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not really the answer I wanted. What I wanted to hear was that there's a PL/SQL construct which exist, which I've been ignorant of up until now, and which would fulfil my needs. But yours is the most honest answer, and you certainly read the question before attempting to answer it! For that you get a +1, and I'll mark this as the accepted answer if I don't hear anything better within a few days. – cartbeforehorse Dec 6 '13 at 22:18

Try using a simple loop and test with the %NOTFOUND attribute of the cursor, like this:

DECLARE 
    CURSOR test_cur IS
        SELECT 'a'
        FROM   table_with_zero_or_more_data;
    r_test test_cur%ROWTYPE;
BEGIN
    OPEN test_cur;

    FETCH test_cur INTO r_test;

    IF test_cur%NOTFOUND THEN
        dbms_output.put_line('No data found');
    ELSE
        LOOP
            FETCH test_cur INTO r_test;
            EXIT WHEN test_cur%NOTFOUND;
            dbms_output.put_line('One extra row found');
            -- 
            -- other routine code if there are rows found.
            -- 
        END LOOP;
    END IF;
END;
/

See Oracle Docs for more details on FETCH.

Also see the SQL Fiddle by Nicholas Krasnov in a comment below. It is very helpful.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, this doesn't work. You will ALWAYS hit the %NOTFOUND condition on the last row of data, regardless of whether or not there is data in the table. In other words, you will always print No data found. – cartbeforehorse Dec 2 '13 at 16:14
    
I have edited my answer slightly and verified it. It does run. The %NOTFOUND is not a condition but a cursor attribute which is set true if you try to fetch after the last row has been fetched or if you fetch from an empty cursor. Replace the table_with_zero_or_more_data with dual in your query and verify this at your end. – Rachcha Dec 3 '13 at 1:47
1  
It can be, as I think, simplified a little. Number of IF statements can be reduced to one. – Nicholas Krasnov Dec 3 '13 at 8:07
    
@Rachcha I did. I included a sqlfiddle link in my previous comment. – Nicholas Krasnov Dec 3 '13 at 17:27
1  
Okay, so after a THIRD edit, this answer STILL doesn't work according to defined specification. You do 2 FETCH statements before you process the data. This means that if the table contains any data, you'll ALWAYS miss the first row. The solution (by the way) is to put your One extra row found line before the FETCH and EXIT statements inside the loop. <Sigh>. Please give up now and don't treat me as a PL/SQL newbie. Even after a fourth correction, you'll still fail to answer the original question of how to do this with an implicit cursor. – cartbeforehorse Dec 6 '13 at 22:25

a similar method is to use the %ROWCOUNT attribute of the cursor. For reference to other cursor attributes, please use the link http://docs.oracle.com/cd/B12037_01/appdev.101/b10807/13_elems011.htm The implementation using ROWCOUNT is given below.

DECLARE 
CURSOR test_cur IS
    SELECT 'a'
    FROM   table_with_zero_or_more_data;
i NUMBER := 0;
r_test test_cur%ROWTYPE;
BEGIN
   OPEN test_cur;

LOOP
    FETCH test_cur INTO r_test;
    IF NOT test_cur%ROWCOUNT > 0 THEN
        dbms_output.put_line("No data found");
        EXIT;
    ELSE
        dbms_output.put_line("extra row found. Row count is now "||test_cur%ROWCOUNT);
    END IF;
    ...
    ... -- other routine code if there are rows found.
    ...
END LOOP;
END;
/
share|improve this answer
    
This does work (ish). However, you need to put an EXIT WHEN test_cur%NOTFOUND condition before your business logic (i.e. before your "extra row found" statement). You also don't need the ELSE statement in there. Simply END IF; (after the first EXIT; condition), followed by the %NOTFOUND EXIT condition, followed by your business logic. However, this answer fails by using explicit cursors. Sorry! – cartbeforehorse Dec 2 '13 at 16:31
1  
PS: don't you think that cur%ROWCOUNT = 0 is simpler than NOT cur%ROWCOUNT > 0? You seem to be using the double-negative of programming! – cartbeforehorse Dec 2 '13 at 16:48
    
point duely noted :-) – Tom Thomas Dec 2 '13 at 17:26
 DECLARE
     CURSOR CEMP 
     IS 
     SELECT *FROM EMP ;
     V_EMP CEMP%ROWTYPE;
 BEGIN
     OPEN CEMP;
     LOOP
         FETCH CEMP INTO V_EMP;
         IF CEMP%ROWCOUNT=0 or  CEMP%ROWCOUNT IS NULL  
         THEN
             DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('No Data Found');
         END IF;
         EXIT WHEN CEMP%NOTFOUND;
         DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(V_EMP.ENAME);
     END LOOP;
     CLOSE CEMP;
 END;
/
share|improve this answer
    
This is a poor answer. You have to check for the presence of data on each loop of your cursor, which is a big waste of resource if your table contains a large number of rows. I only want to check once!! – cartbeforehorse Oct 19 '15 at 9:41

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