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This is code which I have written to time how long it takes to perform a selection sort:

static public String [ ] selectionSort(String [ ] wordlist)
{
    for (int i = 1; i < wordlist.length; i++) 
    {
        int s = i-1;

        for (int j = i; j < wordlist.length; j++) 
        {
            if (wordlist[j].compareTo(wordlist[s]) < 0) 
            {
                s = j;
            }
        }

     String temp = wordlist[i-1];
     wordlist[i-1] = wordlist[s];
     wordlist[s] = temp;
    }

    return wordlist;
}

static public String [ ] timedSelectionSort(String [ ] wordlist)
{
    long startTime = 0;
    long stopTime = 0;
    long elapsedMillis = 0;
    long elapsedSec = 0;
    long elapsedMin = 0;     

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();

    wordlist = selectionSort(wordlist);

    stopTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    elapsedMillis = stopTime-startTime;
    elapsedSec = elapsedMillis/1000;
    elapsedMin = elapsedMillis/60000;
    System.out.printf("File reading took %d minutes and %s secs and %d milliseconds to execute\n",
                        elapsedMin,elapsedSec%60, elapsedMillis%1000);  
    System.out.println("Read " + wordlist.length + " strings.");

    return wordlist;
}

I have to also time a how long it takes to make an arraylist object containing all of the strings in an array (my attempt is below)

static public ArrayList<String> makeArrayListClassObject(String [ ] wordlist)
{
    long startTime = 0;
    long stopTime = 0;
    long elapsedMillis = 0;
    long elapsedSec = 0;
    long elapsedMin = 0;     

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();

    ArrayList<String> stringList = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(wordlist));

    stopTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    elapsedMillis = stopTime-startTime;
    elapsedSec = elapsedMillis/1000;
    elapsedMin = elapsedMillis/60000;
    System.out.printf("File reading took %d minutes and %s secs and %d milliseconds to execute\n",
                        elapsedMin,elapsedSec%60, elapsedMillis%1000);  
    System.out.println("Read " + wordlist.length + " strings.");

    return stringList;
}

as well as time how long it takes to sort the arraylist object using the Collections.sort( ) method. I have made the method (see below) but I don't know how to time it

static public void collectionsClassSort(ArrayList<String> arraylist)
{
    Collections.sort(arraylist);
}

I guess my questions are: 1. Is there a way to use the same method to time these two methods the way I timed the first method? 2. If not, how can I time these two methods?

EDIT: the timed collections sort now works, but the timed building of the arraylist still does not. meaning that the timer says that the method took 0 minutes, 0 seconds, and 0 milliseconds to execute

This is the updated code for that:

static public ArrayList<String> makeArrayListClassObject(String [ ] wordlist)
{
    long startTime = 0;
    long stopTime = 0;
    long elapsedMillis = 0;
    long elapsedSec = 0;
    long elapsedMin = 0;     

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();

    ArrayList<String> stringList = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(wordlist));

    stopTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    elapsedMillis = stopTime-startTime;
    elapsedSec = elapsedMillis/1000;
    elapsedMin = elapsedMillis/60000;
    System.out.printf("File reading took %d minutes and %s secs and %d milliseconds to execute\n",
                        elapsedMin,elapsedSec%60, elapsedMillis%1000);  

    return stringList;                  
}
share|improve this question
    
How is this case different? What confuses you here? – PM 77-1 Dec 2 '13 at 16:50
    
I have tried to time the other methods using the same basic formula, and it has not worked. – Elisa O Dec 2 '13 at 16:54
    
Please describe your "it hasn't worked" in more detail. – PM 77-1 Dec 2 '13 at 17:22
    
please see my newest edit. – Elisa O Dec 2 '13 at 17:32

Why can't you just use something like this,

startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();

Collections.sort(arraylist);

stopTime = System.currentTimeMillis();

Its samething that you used above.

share|improve this answer
    
oh, duh. this worked, thanks. – Elisa O Dec 2 '13 at 17:28

You need to distinguish between "doesn't work" and "doesn't produce a meaningful result".

It seems that your wordList string array is not large enough to notice time difference.

Two suggestions:

  1. Test it with a much bigger array: hundreds of thousands of words (see my test code at the bottom)

  2. Use System.nanoTime() that should yield better precision (see the explanation below).

From David Holmes' Weblog:

The absolute "time-of-day" clock is represented by the System.currentTimeMillis() method, that returns a millisecond representation of wall-clock time in milliseconds since the epoch. As such it uses the operating system's "time of day" clock. The update resolution of this clock is often the same as the timer interrupt (eg. 10ms), but on some systems is fixed, independent of the interrupt rate.

The relative-time clock is represented by the System.nanoTime() method that returns a "free-running" time in nanoseconds. This time is useful only for comparison with other nanoTime values. The nanoTime method uses the highest resolution clock available on the platform, and while its return value is in nanoseconds, the update resolution is typically only microseconds. However, on some systems there is no choice but to use the same clock source as for currentTimeMillis() - fortunately this is rare and mostly affects old Linux systems, and Windows 98.

You should always try to use nanoTime to do timing measurement or calculation (and yes there are JDK API's that don't do this), in the hope that it will have a better resolution than currentTimeMillis.

The following code produced "2" on my system:

import java.util.*;


public class ArrayTime {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        String[] wordList = new String [600000];
        for(int i=0; i<wordList.length; ++i)
            wordList[i] = "" + i;
        long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        ArrayList<String> stringList = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(wordList));
        long elapsedTime =  System.currentTimeMillis() - start;
        System.out.println(elapsedTime);

    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Late response, but using a larger data file did in fact yield the result I was looking for. Thank you. – Elisa O Dec 7 '13 at 18:33

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