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Context:

I have a list. Using jQuery, I'm dynamically...

  1. ...hiding/showing certain list-items.
  2. ...calculating the the third and fourth list-items to apply specific classes.

Problem:

A CSS style (from a stylesheet), using an nth-child selector, is being applied to every third list item. The problem is that when I dynamically hide/show list items, the CSS nth-child selector doesn't seem to be recalculating.

Since jQuery is already calculating the third list item, I don't need to recalculate the CSS nth-child selector unless there is no means of cancelling it out or destroying it.

Code:

The mark-up:

<ul class="teamlist">
    <li>Content</li>
    <li>Content</li>
    <li>Content</li>
    <li>Content</li>
    <li>Content</li>
    <li>Content</li>
    <li>Content</li>
    <li>Content</li>
    <li>Content</li>
    <li>Content</li>
</ul>

The jQuery:

$('.teamlist li:visible').each(function (i) {
    if (i % 3 == 0) $(this).addClass('teamlist_fourth_item');
});
$('.teamlist li:visible').each(function (i) {
   if ((i+1) % 3 == 0) $(this).addClass('teamlist_third_item');
});

The unwanted CSS:

.teamlist li:nth-child(3n+3) {
    margin-right: 0;
}

Question:

How do I destroy or force the recalculation of CSS nth-child selector?

share|improve this question
    
I would use javascript to apply the nth-child class as a function, this way it will work down to IE8 and then everytime you run your code to add or remove a list item it would recalculate –  user934902 Dec 2 '13 at 19:42
2  
nth-child doesn't change for hidden elements, so unless you're adding or removing DOM nodes, CSS won't suddenly change which elements are matched. –  zzzzBov Dec 2 '13 at 19:43
    
The easy answer is destroy the CSS ... so just remove it form the file what is the real problem ? –  Danko Dec 2 '13 at 19:51
    
@Danko - Removing the code (rather than destroying or overriding it) requires me to edit a parent WordPress theme (which won't survive upgrades). I was hoping to figure out a swift way of countering the undesired style without deleting it. –  Clarus Dignus Dec 2 '13 at 19:59
    
Thanks more clear to me i guess you have a default margin-right for all the li elements and are you able to write a new css rule? –  Danko Dec 2 '13 at 20:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

After the comments i think what you need is to override that class to make it just equal with the properties for all li elements, you can make your own class that match those elements with a better level of specificity, for example with the id or class of the parent ul:

#parent .teamlist li:nth-child(3n+3) {
    margin-right:2%;
}

Or with an id on your ul

<ul class="teamlist" id="lista">

#lista.teamlist li:nth-child(3n+3) {
    margin-right:2%;
}

Also try to be sure your CSS is loaded after the other one

Other way you can work with Jquery too and modify this with the same CSS selector:

$('.teamlist li:nth-child(3n+3)').css('margin-right','2%');
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant. Thank you! I equalised nth-child style and allowed jQuery to handle the calculation of the third list item. When I tried this earlier, my selector didn't have the greater specificity and was therefore being overridden. –  Clarus Dignus Dec 2 '13 at 21:11
    
Glad to help you –  Danko Dec 2 '13 at 21:11

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