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I am writing a test case for my class that has methods which throw exceptions (both checked and runtime). I have tried different possible ways of testing as suggested in this link.. It appears they seem to work only for runtime exceptions. for Checked exceptions, I need to do a try/catch/assert as shown in the code below. Is there any alternatives to try/catch/assert/. you will notice that testmethod2() and testmethod2_1() shows compile error but testmethod2_2() does not show compile error which uses try/catch.

class MyException extends Exception {

    public MyException(String message){
        super(message);
    }
}


public class UsualStuff {

    public void method1(int i) throws IllegalArgumentException{
        if (i<0)
           throw new IllegalArgumentException("value cannot be negative");
        System.out.println("The positive value is " + i );
    }

    public void method2(int i) throws MyException {
        if (i<10)
            throw new MyException("value is less than 10");
        System.out.println("The value is "+ i);
    }

    }

Test class:

import static org.junit.Assert.*;

import org.junit.Before;
import org.junit.Rule;
import org.junit.Test;
import org.junit.rules.ExpectedException;


public class UsualStuffTest {

    private UsualStuff u;

    @Before
    public void setUp() throws Exception {
        u = new UsualStuff();
    }

    @Rule
    public ExpectedException exception = ExpectedException.none();

    @Test(expected = IllegalArgumentException.class)
    public void testMethod1() {
        u.method1(-1);
    }

    @Test(expected = MyException.class)
    public void testMethod2() {
        u.method2(9);
    }

    @Test
    public void testMethod2_1(){
        exception.expect(MyException.class);
        u.method2(3);
    }

    public void testMethod2_3(){
        try {
            u.method2(5);
        } catch (MyException e) {
            assertEquals(e.getMessage(), "value is less than 10") ;
        }
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted
@Test(expected = MyException.class)
public void testMethod2() throws MyException {
    u.method2(9);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
why should I have throws MyException while I have the @test(expected=MyException.class)` decorator. –  brain storm Dec 2 '13 at 20:27
3  
@user1988876 - because the java compiler doesn't know anything about junit annotations and what they mean. –  jtahlborn Dec 2 '13 at 20:50

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