Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have just started using netwire and I'm having trouble with the very basics.

The following code works fine for me:

main :: IO ()
main = testWire clockSession_ (for 3 . yeah)

yeah :: Monad m => Wire s () m a String
yeah = pure "yes"

But this does not:

main :: IO ()
main = testWire clockSession_ forYeah

forYeah :: (Show b, Show e) => Wire s e Identity a b
forYeah = for 3 . yeah

fails with error:

Could not deduce (b ~ [Char])
from the context (Show b, Show e)
bound by the type signature for
forYeah :: (Show b, Show e) => Wire s e Identity a b
  at /home/fiendfan1/workspace/Haskell/Haskell-OpenGL/src/Main.hs:12:12-54
  `b' is a rigid type variable bound by
      the type signature for
        forYeah :: (Show b, Show e) => Wire s e Identity a b
      at /home/fiendfan1/workspace/Haskell/Haskell-OpenGL/src/Main.hs:12:12
Expected type: Wire s e Identity a b
  Actual type: Wire s () Identity a String
In the second argument of `(.)', namely `yeah'
In the expression: for 3 . yeah
In an equation for `forYeah': forYeah = for 3 . yeah

So I changed it to:

forYeah :: Show e => Wire s e Identity a String

which gives me the error:

Could not deduce (e ~ ())
from the context (Show e)
  bound by the type signature for
             forYeah :: Show e => Wire s e Identity a String
  at /home/fiendfan1/workspace/Haskell/Haskell-OpenGL/src/Main.hs:12:12-49
  `e' is a rigid type variable bound by
      the type signature for
        forYeah :: Show e => Wire s e Identity a String
      at /home/fiendfan1/workspace/Haskell/Haskell-OpenGL/src/Main.hs:12:12
Expected type: Wire s e Identity a String
  Actual type: Wire s () Identity a String
In the second argument of `(.)', namely `yeah'
In the expression: for 3 . yeah
In an equation for `forYeah': forYeah = for 3 . yeah

Changing it to:

forYeah :: Wire s () Identity a String

Gives the following error:

No instance for (HasTime Integer s) arising from a use of `for'
Possible fix: add an instance declaration for (HasTime Integer s)
In the first argument of `(.)', namely `for 3'
In the expression: for 3 . yeah
In an equation for `forYeah': forYeah = for 3 . yeah

Can someone explain why this happens and how I can fix my second code example?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Edit: Here's a complete, compiling, running solution to this problem:

module Main (
    main
) where

import Prelude hiding ((.), id)
import qualified Prelude as Prelude
import Control.Wire
import Control.Wire.Interval

main :: IO ()
main = testWire clockSession_ (withoutErrors forYeah)

yeah :: Monad m => Wire s e m a String
yeah = pure "yes"

forYeah :: (Num t, HasTime t s, Monoid e, Monad m) => Wire s e m a String
forYeah = for 3 . yeah

-- This just is an easy way to specify to use () as the type for errors in testWire
withoutErrors :: Wire s () m a b -> Wire s () m a b 
withoutErrors = Prelude.id

Here's the original answer, that discussed why we should change the type of yeah, and then the necessary changes to the type of forYeah:

Change the type of yeah to Monad m => Wire s e m a String. Monad m => (Wire s e m a) has an Applicative instance , so pure should exist without specifying that the second type argument to Wire in yeah's type is ().

Note: I don't use netwire and I haven't tried compiling this. I've only looked at the types in the documentation.

Edit: You probably also need to change the type of forYeah.

Wire also has a Category instance:

Monad m => Category (Wire s e m)

Category's . operator has the following type:

(.) :: cat b c -> cat a b -> cat a c

So for Wires it is:

(.) :: Monad m => Wire s e m b c -> Wire s e m a b -> Wire s e m a c

for has the following type:

for :: (HasTime t s, Monoid e) => t -> Wire s e m a a

So for 3 would have a type like (HasTime Int s, Monoid e) => Wire s e m a a. Combined with yeah's type of Monad m => Wire s e m a String, for 3 . yeah would have a type like

(HasTime Int s, Monoid e, Monad m) => Wire s e m a String

So we could probably change the type of forYeah to:

forYeah :: (HasTime Int s, Monoid e, Monad m) => Wire s e m a String

Edit: Even better type for forYeah

Since an integer numeral (without a decimal point) is actually equivalent to an application of fromInteger to the value of the numeral as an Integer, and fromInteger :: (Num a) => Integer -> a, the literal 3 actually has type Num t => t. The best type we can choose is therefore probably:

forYeah :: (Num t, HasTime t s, Monoid e, Monad m) => Wire s e m a String
share|improve this answer
add comment

It works for me when I change the type of forYeah to

forYeah::Wire (Timed NominalDiffTime ()) () Identity a String

It also works if you leave out the type of forYeah.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I just asked GHCi what the type was:

> :m Control.Wire
> :t for (3 :: Int) . pure "yes"
for 3 . pure "yes" :: (Monad m, HasTime Int s, Monoid e) => Wire s e m a [Char]
> :{
| let forYeah :: HasTime Int s => Wire s () Identity a String
|     forYeah = for 3 . pure "yes"
| :}
> :t forYeah
forYeah :: HasTime Int s => Wire s () Identity a String

So that works. However, when asking the type of testWire clockSession_ forYeah, I get an error saying that it can't match NominalDiffTime with Int, but since NominalDiffTime is also an instance of Num, it's pretty easy to just change the signature:

> :{
| let forYeah :: HasTime NominalDiffTime s => Wire s () Identity a String
|     forYeah = for 3 . pure "yes"
| :}
> :t testWire clockSession_ forYeah
testWire clockSession_ forYeah :: (Applicative m, MonadIO m) => m c

So that seems like it'd work.

Also, it worked when I defined yeah separately as

yeah :: Monad m => Wire s () m a String
yeah = pure "yes"

forYeah :: HasTime t s => Wire s () Identity a String
forYeah = for 3 . yeah

The problem seemed to be in the HasTime constraint. Since you had left it out, the compiler defaulted the literal 3 to the type Integer, but there is not an instance for HasTime Integer s for any s.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.