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Let's say I want to make a class that inherits directly from UIElement and is able to contain one or more [externally added] UIElements as children - like Panels and other container controls. It's obviously easy to have the class house a collection of UIElements in some form or other, but how do I get them to be displayed / rendered along with my class?

I assume they must be added to the visual tree as children of my own UIElement in some way (or, possibly, render them manually à la going via VisualTreeHelper.GetDrawing and do it using OnRender's DrawingContext? But that seems clumsy).

I do not want to know that I can - or should - inherit from more ready-made controls, like FrameworkElement, Panel, ContentControl etc (if anything, I want to know how they are implementing the displaying / rendering of externally added child elements, where applicable).

I have my reasons for wanting to be as high up in the hierarchy as possible, so please don't give me any lectures on why it is a good thing to be XAML / WPF Framework 'compliant' etc.

share|improve this question
    
Inspect PresentationFramework.dll with Reflector or something. – HighCore Dec 2 '13 at 21:24
    
Lol - I was this close to adding "you hear that, HighCore?" at the end of the last paragraph (before I noticed there was a comment.. but you beat me to it). – d7samurai Dec 2 '13 at 21:26
    
Don't remember if I said this to you, but yes, you're an experimented developer who really knows what he's doing, but for most people out there using WPF, it's quite the opposite. That's why I have this cliche of "delete all your code and learn MVVM" thing constantly coming up again and again. Of course that doesn't apply to you, and other pro WPF/XAML devs – HighCore Dec 2 '13 at 21:28
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The following class provides the absolute minimum in terms of layout and rendering of child elements:

public class UIElementContainer : UIElement
{
    private readonly UIElementCollection children;

    public UIElementContainer()
    {
        children = new UIElementCollection(this, null);
    }

    public void AddChild(UIElement element)
    {
        children.Add(element);
    }

    public void RemoveChild(UIElement element)
    {
        children.Remove(element);
    }

    protected override int VisualChildrenCount
    {
        get { return children.Count; }
    }

    protected override Visual GetVisualChild(int index)
    {
        return children[index];
    }

    protected override Size MeasureCore(Size availableSize)
    {
        foreach (UIElement element in children)
        {
            element.Measure(availableSize);
        }

        return new Size();
    }

    protected override void ArrangeCore(Rect finalRect)
    {
        foreach (UIElement element in children)
        {
            element.Arrange(finalRect);
        }
    }
}

It is not required to have a UIElementCollection. An alternative implementation could look like this:

public class UIElementContainer : UIElement
{
    private readonly List<UIElement> children = new List<UIElement>();

    public void AddChild(UIElement element)
    {
        children.Add(element);
        AddVisualChild(element);
    }

    public void RemoveChild(UIElement element)
    {
        if (children.Remove(element))
        {
            RemoveVisualChild(element);
        }
    }

    // plus the four overrides
}
share|improve this answer
    
So the magic happens in UIElementCollection? – d7samurai Dec 2 '13 at 22:09
    
No, you may as well use a plain list and call Add/RemoveVisualChild to set up the visual tree. The magic is in the four overrides. – Clemens Dec 2 '13 at 22:10
    
Great, this is just what I was looking for (and regarding my previous comment: for a second, I thought maybe the handling of the children was embedded in UIElementCollection, since it gets initialized with this - I thought that could mean it did the hooking up with the visual tree etc). How much of this is really stemming from Visual? – d7samurai Dec 2 '13 at 22:18
    
All that has Visual in its name: Add/RemoveVisualChild, VisualChildrenCount and GetVisualChild. UIElement adds MeasureCore and ArrangeCore. – Clemens Dec 2 '13 at 22:29
    
..but inheriting from Visual is useless in practice, right? I read somewhere that its actual rendering mechanisms are Internal so they can only be accessed indirectly, via one of its descendants..? – d7samurai Dec 3 '13 at 11:45

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