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If I have the following code:

array[index] = someValue;

does the someValue or the index get evaluated first?

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marked as duplicate by Henry, Dennis Meng, Izkata, PW Kad, Sean Vieira Dec 3 '13 at 3:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
@Nambari I could give an example, but it would be rather complicated. –  tbodt Dec 2 '13 at 22:36
1  
easy to check by: array[-1] = someMethodThatPrintsSomething(); –  alfasin Dec 2 '13 at 22:38
1  
@alfasin is there a guarantee that it will always behave one way? I can't just test that. –  tbodt Dec 2 '13 at 22:39
    
would you expect the JVM to behave differently every time ? this question doesn't involve any race-condition or anything which has an "unexpected behavior". –  alfasin Dec 3 '13 at 4:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 18 down vote accepted

The index is evaluated first. See JLS section 15.26.1, in particular:

15.26.1. Simple Assignment Operator =

...

If the left-hand operand is an array access expression (§15.13), possibly enclosed in one or more pairs of parentheses, then:

  1. First, the array reference subexpression of the left-hand operand array access expression is evaluated. If this evaluation completes abruptly, then the assignment expression completes abruptly for the same reason; the index subexpression (of the left-hand operand array access expression) and the right-hand operand are not evaluated and no assignment occurs.

  2. Otherwise, the index subexpression of the left-hand operand array access expression is evaluated. If this evaluation completes abruptly, then the assignment expression completes abruptly for the same reason and the right-hand operand is not evaluated and no assignment occurs.

  3. Otherwise, the right-hand operand is evaluated. If this evaluation completes abruptly, then the assignment expression completes abruptly for the same reason and no assignment occurs.

TL;DR: The order is 1[2]=3

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It looks like the index expression is evaluated first.

This test program confirms it:

public class Main {
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      int[] array = new int[10];
      array[getIndex()] = getValue();
   }


   private static int getIndex() {
      System.out.println("getIndex!");
      return 0;
   }

   private static int getValue() {
      System.out.println("getValue!");
      return 1;
   }
}

Output:

getIndex!
getValue!

The value is evaluated even if an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException is thrown. Changing getIndex():

private static int getIndex() {
   System.out.println("getIndex!");
   return -1;  // Hey!
}

Output:

getIndex!
getValue!
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException: -1
    at Main.main(Main.java:11)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:57)
    at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:43)
    at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:606)
    at com.intellij.rt.execution.application.AppMain.main(AppMain.java:90)
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The question is, will it do this for every JVM? Is there a guarantee? –  tbodt Dec 2 '13 at 22:38
    
@tbodt Yes every compiler will generate code that behaves this way; the evaluation order is specified in the JLS. –  Jason C Dec 2 '13 at 22:41
1  
it's a compiler issue not a JVM issue. from jls The Java programming language guarantees that the operands of operators appear to be evaluated in a specific evaluation order, namely, from left to right. –  BevynQ Dec 2 '13 at 22:42
    
@Downvoter Please explain what is wrong/can be corrected. –  rgettman Dec 2 '13 at 22:44

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