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The following code doesn't show the circle on the screen, why doesn't work? I can't see any error.

void display(void){
    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);

    int circle_points=100;
    int i;
    double theta,cx=200, cy=300,r=100;

    int MyCircle(){
        glBegin(GL_LINE_LOOP);
        glColor3f(1.0,1.0,1.0); //preto
        for(i=0;i<circle_points;i++){
            theta=(2*pi*i)/circle_points;
            glVertex2f(cx+r*cos(theta),cy+r*sin(theta));
        }
        glEnd();
    }
    glFlush();
}
share|improve this question
    
You shouldn't use single-buffered drawing. On most modern operating systems with compositing window managers this will result in nothing shown on screen. They only update the contents of the window when you swap a back buffer to front, if you draw directly into the front buffer you are asking for trouble. This is not necessarily the cause of your problem, but it something you should be aware of. Double-buffering is really cheap on modern desktop hardware (the framebuffer is only a small portion of total VRAM these days), there is no real benefit to not using it. –  Andon M. Coleman Dec 3 '13 at 1:24
    
Is it enfolded function (surely looks like it)? Does it even called from anywhere? What are projection and modelview matrices? –  keltar Dec 3 '13 at 5:25

1 Answer 1

No idea why you are trying to declare a function inside a function. I'm not quite sure how that compiled, much less ran.

The logic is sound though:

enter image description here

#include <GL/glut.h>
#include <math.h>

void MyCircle( void )
{
    const int circle_points=100;
    const float cx=0, cy=0, r=100;
    const float pi = 3.14159f;
    int i = 0;

    glBegin(GL_LINE_LOOP);
    glColor3f(1.0,1.0,1.0); //preto
    for(i=0;i<circle_points;i++)
    {
        const float theta=(2*pi*i)/circle_points;
        glVertex2f(cx+r*cos(theta),cy+r*sin(theta));
    }
    glEnd();
}

void display( void )
{
    const double w = glutGet( GLUT_WINDOW_WIDTH );
    const double h = glutGet( GLUT_WINDOW_HEIGHT );
    const double ar = w / h;

    glClear( GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT );

    glMatrixMode( GL_PROJECTION );
    glLoadIdentity();
    glOrtho( -150 * ar, 150 * ar, -150, 150, -1, 1 );

    glMatrixMode( GL_MODELVIEW );
    glLoadIdentity();

    MyCircle();

    glutSwapBuffers();
}

int main( int argc, char **argv )
{
    glutInit( &argc, argv );
    glutInitDisplayMode( GLUT_RGBA | GLUT_DOUBLE );
    glutInitWindowSize( 640, 480 );
    glutCreateWindow( "GLUT" );
    glutDisplayFunc( display );
    glutMainLoop();
    return 0;
}
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It's really desnecessary 2 functions one inside another. Removing the function MyCircle, the circle appears \o/ what a shame! What I noticed is that the function MyCircle wasn't executed for not being called in anywhere. Thanks anyway. –  elly Dec 3 '13 at 23:20

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