Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a problem where I need to get the earliest date value from a table grouped by a column, but sequentially grouped.

Here is a sample table:

if object_id('tempdb..#tmp') is NOT null 
    DROP TABLE #tmp

CREATE TABLE #tmp
(
    UserID              BIGINT		NOT NULL,
    JobCodeID           BIGINT		NOT NULL,
    LastEffectiveDate   DATETIME	NOT NULL
)

INSERT INTO #tmp VALUES ( 1, 5, '1/1/2010') 
INSERT INTO #tmp VALUES ( 1, 5, '1/2/2010') 
INSERT INTO #tmp VALUES ( 1, 6, '1/3/2010') 
INSERT INTO #tmp VALUES ( 1, 5, '1/4/2010') 
INSERT INTO #tmp VALUES ( 1, 1, '1/5/2010') 
INSERT INTO #tmp VALUES ( 1, 1, '1/6/2010')

SELECT JobCodeID, MIN(LastEffectiveDate)
FROM #tmp
WHERE UserID = 1
GROUP BY JobCodeID

DROP TABLE [#tmp]

This query will return 3 rows, with the min value.

1   2010-01-05 00:00:00.000
5   2010-01-01 00:00:00.000
6   2010-01-03 00:00:00.000

What I am looking for is for the group to be sequential and return more than one JobCodeID, like this:

5   2010-01-01 00:00:00.000
6   2010-01-03 00:00:00.000
5   2010-01-04 00:00:00.000
1   2010-01-05 00:00:00.000

Is this possible without a cursor?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
SELECT  JobCodeId, MIN(LastEffectiveDate) AS mindate
FROM    (
        SELECT  *,
                prn - rn AS diff
        FROM    (
                SELECT  *,
                        ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY JobCodeID 
                                    ORDER BY LastEffectiveDate) AS prn,
                        ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY LastEffectiveDate) AS rn
                FROM    @tmp
                ) q
        ) q2
GROUP BY
        JobCodeId, diff
ORDER BY
        mindate

Continuous ranges have same difference between partitioned and unpartitioned ROW_NUMBERs.

You can use this value in the GROUP BY.

See this article in my blog for more detail on how it works:

share|improve this answer
    
+1 elegant solution –  TheVillageIdiot Jan 9 '10 at 17:28

First comment - using a table variable not a temp table would be better practice. Then you can use a trick like this. Make sure you insert the values in the right order (i.e. ascending LastEffectiveDate):

DECLARE @tmp table
(
    Sequence            INT IDENTITY,
    UserID              BIGINT,
    JobCodeID           BIGINT,
    LastEffectiveDate   DATETIME
)

INSERT INTO @tmp VALUES ( 1, 5, '1/1/2010') 
INSERT INTO @tmp VALUES ( 1, 5, '1/2/2010') 
INSERT INTO @tmp VALUES ( 1, 6, '1/3/2010') 
INSERT INTO @tmp VALUES ( 1, 5, '1/4/2010') 
INSERT INTO @tmp VALUES ( 1, 1, '1/5/2010') 
INSERT INTO @tmp VALUES ( 1, 1, '1/6/2010')

SELECT TOP 1 JobCodeID, LastEffectiveDate
FROM @tmp

UNION ALL

SELECT t2.JobCodeID, t2.LastEffectiveDate
FROM @tmp t1
    INNER JOIN
        @tmp t2
        ON t1.Sequence + 1 = t2.Sequence
WHERE t1.JobCodeID <> t2.JobCodeID

This outputs the first date each time the job code changes, which I am guessing is what you want from your description.

share|improve this answer
    
Please note edit before pasting and running - ORDER BY was breaking it. –  David M Jan 9 '10 at 17:10
    
The temp table was to represent an existing table, that is why I used it. I have an actual table that needs to utilize the query. –  Steve Wright Jan 9 '10 at 17:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.