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Today, when I am coding, this question occurred to me. When we want to define and use a variable, should we make its scope bigger or not? Especially when the same variable would be used in several block statements, but there isn't any relation between these block statements with this variable. So which is better? Let the variable outside all block statements, or define in each block statement. Give out an example like this:

FIRST:

int vl_ret = 0;
int b = 1;
int c = 1;

if (b == 1)
{
    vl_ret = do_something();

    if (vl_ret == 1)
    {
        printf("1\n");
    }
    else
    {
        printf("0\n");
    }
}

if (c == 1)
{
    vl_ret = do_something();

    if (vl_ret == 1)
    {
        printf("1\n");
    }
    else
    {
        printf("0\n");
    }
}

or SECOND:

int b = 1;
int c = 1;

if (b == 1)
{
    iny vl_ret = do_something();

    if (vl_ret = 1)
    {
        printf("1\n");
    }
    else
    {
        printf("0\n");
    }
}

if (c == 1)
{
    int vl_ret = do_something();

    if (vl_ret = 1)
    {
        printf("1\n");
    }
    else
    {
        printf("0\n");
    }
}

because these local variables are allocate from the stack, so it can be very fast, we can ignore the more spent time by allocate form stack in the second method.

I think, the second is better, because I just need this variable in each block statement, if once i don't need it, I can easily modify my code. And in the second method, the code is much clearer. We can see, the variable also will not be influenced by other block statements.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Shafik Yaghmour, WhozCraig, Luchian Grigore, Chris, Dave Alperovich Dec 3 '13 at 4:19

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
You have a lot of errors in your code. Please fix them. Example: if (vl_ret = 1) –  Fiddling Bits Dec 3 '13 at 2:30
    
im sorry, i fixed them, and this code is not for run. –  sunnyleevip Dec 3 '13 at 2:32
    
The code you post should always be executable. :-D –  Fiddling Bits Dec 3 '13 at 2:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think, the second is better, because I just need this variable in each block statement, if once i don't need it, I can easily modify my code. And in the second method, the code is much clearer. We can see, the variable also will not be influenced by other block statements.

You think right. That said, you might very occasionally decide to reuse a variable for unrelated purposes anyway if:

  • you need to be concerned about performance issues (e.g. many standard containers reused typically do fewer dynamic memory allocations, but the peak memory may not be freed until all uses conclude and it finally leaves scope), and/or
  • it's an verbose/obfuscating pain to recreate the variable in many local scopes (e.g. long list of nested namespaces/class-names and/or template parameters), particularly if you need to introduce a scope just to control the variable's lifetime.
share|improve this answer
    
OK, can i understand your words like that, how i deal with this problem, should according to the actual situation. and in most cases, we should keep the scope of variables as small as i can, particularly when variables are not new/malloc by myself? –  sunnyleevip Dec 3 '13 at 3:20
    
Yes, that's a reasonable way to approach it. Small scopes normally, and you'll notice when that's a pain for some reason, then can consider the pros/cons. –  Tony D Dec 3 '13 at 3:25
    
Thank you so much. –  sunnyleevip Dec 3 '13 at 8:21

In general, narrowing scope usually improves readability and understanding, because in most cases it allows you to see the entire lifetime of the variable on one screen or less.

Nothing's worse than debugging a bit of code that sets a variable on one page, and then uses it three pages later, especially if the connection was unintentional.

You generally do not need to worry about using "too many" variables, as for most things, the compiler will handle their allocation automatically. If a variable is no longer "live", the compiler will reuse the storage transparently for you.

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It's useful and thank you so much. –  sunnyleevip Dec 3 '13 at 3:13

I'd always recommend keeping the scope of variables as small (as short a lifetime) as possible. It makes it clearer when reading code (what does this variable do?), and helps prevent accidentally using a variable for the wrong thing. There's nothing worse than seeing a bTemp and bTemp2 re-used 15 places in one function.

Don't worry about having "too many" variables, or any sort of optimization when it comes to scope. If the compiler can determine that two variables are never used at the same time (like your two vl_ret variables in your second example), it will probably put them in the same location on the stack anyway (as if they were the same variable).

Also, don't concern yourself with "allocation" of stack variables. In general, the entire stack frame is set up when the function is first called, so the space for all variables is reserved immediately.

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It's so clear, and thank you so much. –  sunnyleevip Dec 3 '13 at 3:11

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