Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

So I am essentially trying to shove the rtti of a parameter pack into a list of type_info*. But for some reason, it doesn't seem to compile (or rather the compiler gives up half way through). Either way I can't seem to figure it out. Does anyone have a method to fix this, or better yet, know why it's breaking? Anywho, here's the code:

#pragma once
#include <typeinfo>
#include <vector>

class ParamChecker
{
public:
    typedef std::vector<const type_info*> Types;

    template <typename T> void PushType()
    {
        types.push_back(&typeid(T));
    }

    template <typename Head, typename... Tail> void PushTypes()
    {
        PushType<Head>();
        PushTypes<Tail...>();
    }
    void PushTypes() {}

private:
    Types types;
};

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
what compiler are you using? –  Sam Miller Dec 3 '13 at 6:20
    
Visual Studio 2013, not quite sure on the exact version. –  Toms Jensen Dec 3 '13 at 6:22
    
What do you mean, breaking the compiler? Does the compiler crash? –  DanielKO Dec 3 '13 at 6:45
    
Possibly a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/3052579/… –  DanielKO Dec 3 '13 at 6:45
3  
Always copy and paste the error messages and post them so that others see them exactly as you see them. –  n.m. Dec 3 '13 at 8:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I don't have Visual Studio to test, but I see the problem in your code so I'll tell you about that, and you can test on Visual Studio.

The problem is that, when you recurse into PushTypes<Tail...>(); and Tail... is empty, you're calling, PushTypes<>();. Notice that your base case, void PushTypes() {} is not a template function, i.e. you can't call it via PushTypes<>();.

Also note that you'll need a class template as a helper because we don't have partial specializations for function templates yet (hopefully it'll be coming soon).

But here's what you can do.

#include <typeinfo>
#include <vector>

class ParamChecker {
  public:

  /* Our type info structure. */
  using Types = std::vector<const std::type_info *>;

  /* Delegate work to PushTypesImpl<>. */
  template <typename... Types>
  void PushTypes() {
    PushTypesImpl<Types...>()(types_);
  }

  private:

  /* Forward declaration. */
  template <typename... Types>
  class PushTypesImpl;

  /* Collection of type information. */
  Types types_;

};  // ParamChecker

/* Base case. */
template <>
class ParamChecker::PushTypesImpl<> {
  public:

  void operator()(Types &) const { /* Do nothing. */ }

};

/* Recursive case. */
template <typename Head, typename... Tail>
class ParamChecker::PushTypesImpl<Head, Tail...> {
  public:

  void operator()(Types &types) const {
    types.push_back(&typeid(Head));
    PushTypesImpl<Tail...>()(types);
  }

};

int main() {
  ParamChecker x;
  x.PushTypes<>();  // push nothing.
  x.PushTypes<int>();  // push int.
  x.PushTypes<int, double>();  // push int and double.
}

EDIT: The following is an alternative approach using type_list and passing it as an argument.

NOTE: The use of type_list<> here instead of tuple<> is because constructing an empty tuple requires that all of the types be default-constructable, and even if they were all default-constructable, we don't want to default-construct them for no reason.

template <typename... Types>
class type_list {};

class ParamChecker {
  public:

  /* Our type info structure. */
  using Types = std::vector<const std::type_info *>;

  /* Base case. Do nothing. */
  void PushTypes(type_list<> &&) {}

  /* Recursive case. */
  template <typename Head, typename... Tail>
  void PushTypes(type_list<Head, Tail...> &&) {
    types_.push_back(&typeid(Head));
    PushTypes(type_list<Tail...>());
  }

  private:

  /* Collection of type information. */
  Types types_;

};  // ParamChecker

int main() {
  ParamChecker x;
  x.PushTypes(type_list<>());  // push nothing.
  x.PushTypes(type_list<int>());  // push int.
  x.PushTypes(type_list<int, double>());  // push int and double.
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm... Thanks for the input. I have gotten something running with the help of tuples, but I'll still try to get around to testing this. I dont have access to my pc today though, so I'll have to wait till tomorrow :/ –  Toms Jensen Dec 5 '13 at 20:49
    
Did you make the PushTypes function take a tuple as a parameter? –  mpark Dec 6 '13 at 1:15
    
Yes. That way the parameter pack was contained and easier to work with. Plus, since it was contained, the compiler did not get confused. –  Toms Jensen Dec 7 '13 at 0:20
    
I'm guessing that your solution looks like, void PushTypes(std::tuple<> &&); and void PushTypes(std::tuple<Head, Tail...> &&);, with the call-site looking like: PushTypes(std::tuple<int, double>());. Personally I think PushTypes<int, double>() is a cleaner interface, even though the implementation being uglier, I prefer usually that the call-site be clean. However, if you decide that you still favor the tuple approach, then consider using a type_list instead. –  mpark Dec 7 '13 at 0:38
    
Edited answer to present alternative solution. –  mpark Dec 7 '13 at 0:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.