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I am testing the speed of Python in comparison with Matlab. I decided to move to Python because of the many advantages it has but I wanted to compare the speed to see what is the difference in this regard.

I tested some for loops to fill a 1000 x 1000 matrix, like this:

from numpy import *

sizeM = 1000
y = zeros((sizeM,sizeM))
x = 4
tic = time.clock()

for i in range(sizeM):
    for j in range(sizeM):
        y[i,j] = cos(i*j) + i * sin(x**2);

toc = time.clock()
time = toc-tic

time is 5.93 sseconds in this way. But in Matlab it takes only 0.11 seconds using the following code:

tic
sizeM = 1000;
y = zeros(sizeM);
x =4;
for i = 1:sizeM
     for j = 1:sizeM
         y(i,j) = cos(i*j) + i * sin(x^2);
     end
end

toc

My question is:

Is this right?

Is Matlab faster than Python in general doing nested for loops? or I am doing something wrong here?

Thanks for your help.

share|improve this question
1  
In general speedgain won't be a sufficient argument to migrate from matlab to python. -- Also note that in the matlab code you actually initialized the big matrix, whilst in the python code this is outside the timing. -- Furthermore it would probably even be faster to vectorize the matlab operation. –  Dennis Jaheruddin Dec 3 '13 at 10:47
    
I completely agree with you. I have already decided to move to python because of many other arguments, this is just one thing that I wanted to test. –  betelgeuse Dec 3 '13 at 10:49
1  
Why did you not conclude that Python is slower at evaluating trigonometric expressions than Matlab ? That seems to be at least as plausible a conclusion from your test. –  High Performance Mark Dec 3 '13 at 10:49
    
That is not necessarily true. I tested some other codes without nested loops with trigonometric expressions and python is faster in some cases... –  betelgeuse Dec 3 '13 at 10:51
    
You should also use xrange instead of range. With range you're explicitly creating a list of sizeM elements in memory for each loop, which is especially bad for the inner loop. MATLAB is not doing this for the basic syntax for i=1:N –  sebastian Dec 3 '13 at 15:19

3 Answers 3

I hope you are aware that in both languages you should write vectorized code!

  1. Matlab has a just in time accelerator I believe, which may kicks in for such an expression, I am not sure what happens if you would call your own function in the inside loop.
  2. Looping itself is not everything, most of the time what is inside the innermost loop is more important. So the whole question if nested loops are slower or faster is probably often the wrong question.
  3. NumPy is written to work with arrays. Giving it scalars like that adds a lot of overhead, if you really want to use float scalars (you shouldn't since you can vectorize the operation), you might as well use math.sin...

Anyway, compare the vectorized code:

i, j = np.ogrid[:1000,:1000] # or whatever else you want to use
y = np.cos(i * j) + i * np.sin(x**2)

Probably you could optimize that further, but it shouldn't matter.


Since it seems discussions might start here, I am not sure how matlab overheads are for scalars, possibly very small (quite certainly with successfull JIT), but this is meant as an explanation why this code snipplet can be slow with numpy. Please no language comparisons...

What can probably be said safely is that, especially if the JIT kicks in in matlab, it is necessary to try harder vectorizing (or port to a compiled language, which works well in both) speed sensitive code in NumPy.

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3  
The vectorization skills developed on old-time Matlab (pre JIT) port nicely to numpy. numpy in fact is nicer, since it has more powerful broadcasting rules. Octave also requires those skills. It was only a release or two back that Octave got numpy like broadcasting. I'm afraid the Matlab JIT is going to produce a whole generation of Matlab programmers without the ability to think in terms of multidimensional arrays. –  hpaulj Dec 3 '13 at 18:01
    
That ogrid vectorization gives a 100x speed improvement. –  hpaulj Dec 4 '13 at 2:44
1  
Replacing numpy.sin with math.sin in this code gives between 8.8x and 10.5x time improvement on my test machines –  alko Dec 4 '13 at 6:15
    
Yeah, that should be much better with newer/future numpy versions, but there is an overhead. –  seberg Dec 4 '13 at 8:48

The answer is that you are really not testing the nested loops here. Most of the time will not be spent on looping, but on evaluating the expressions in the loop.

If you want to test the loop and the filling of the matrix you could do something more trivial like so:

from numpy import *

sizeM = 1000
y = zeros((sizeM,sizeM))
x = 4
tic = time.clock()

for i in range(sizeM):
    for j in range(sizeM):
        y[i,j] = 1;

toc = time.clock()
time = toc-tic

Compared to:

sizeM = 1000;
y = zeros(sizeM);
x =4;
tic
for i = 1:sizeM
     for j = 1:sizeM
         y(i,j) = 1;
     end
end
toc
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Yes I did that, you're right. But it is the same. Python: 0.21 sec, Matlab: 0.008 sec –  betelgeuse Dec 3 '13 at 10:59
3  
Of course, as you know Dennis, Matlab programmers would probably just write y=1 and get on with something more interesting. Let the compiler (and Python programmers) worry about writing nested loops. –  High Performance Mark Dec 3 '13 at 11:00
    
@HighPerformanceMark "Numpython" programmers would also write y=ones(1000)... –  jorgeca Dec 3 '13 at 16:46
    
@jorgeca: I count 9 extra characters on the rhs of that assignment statement compared with the Matlab version. Those wretched numpython programmers are wearing their poor little fingers to the bone. –  High Performance Mark Dec 3 '13 at 16:58
2  
@HighPerformanceMark I don't think y=1 creates an array with a 1000 ones ;) But yeah, matlab is terser because you don't need to type np. all the time. On the other hand, the zen of Python says "Namespaces are one honking great idea -- let's do more of those!" :) –  jorgeca Dec 3 '13 at 17:08

The JIT compiler facilitates optimizing the MATLAB for loop (Python, as well, supports some forms of JIT compilation though). You can disable/enable the JIT accelerator using feature accel off and feature accel on, and test again with the below codes. Python:

import time    
sizeM = 1000

tic = time.clock()

for i in range(sizeM):
   for j in range(sizeM):
      pass

toc = time.clock()
time = toc-tic
print time

Matlab test1:

sizeM = 1000;
tic
for i = 1:sizeM
   for j = 1:sizeM
     ;
   end
end
toc

Matlab test2:

sizeM = 1000;
tic
for i = [1:sizeM]
   for j = [1:sizeM]
     ;
   end
end
toc

You can also compare the speed of range(sizeM) and xrange(sizeM) if you like.

share|improve this answer
1  
Perhaps you could add something like a conclusion to your answer? –  Dennis Jaheruddin Dec 4 '13 at 8:50

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