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After doing a Oracle tutorial about the TableView, I was wondering if there's a way to programmatically apply different CSS style to the selected TableView row. For example, user selects a certain row, clicks the "Highlight" button and the selected row gets brown background, white text fill, etc. I've read the JavaFX tableview colors, Updating TableView row appearance and Background with 2 colors in JavaFX?, but to no avail =/

Here's the source:

import javafx.application.Application;
import javafx.beans.property.SimpleStringProperty;
import javafx.collections.FXCollections;
import javafx.collections.ObservableList;
import javafx.event.ActionEvent;
import javafx.event.EventHandler;
import javafx.geometry.Insets;
import javafx.scene.Group;
import javafx.scene.Scene;
import javafx.scene.control.Button;
import javafx.scene.control.Label;
import javafx.scene.control.TableColumn;
import javafx.scene.control.TableView;
import javafx.scene.control.cell.PropertyValueFactory;
import javafx.scene.layout.VBox;
import javafx.scene.text.Font;
import javafx.stage.Stage;

public class TableViewSample extends Application {

    private TableView<Person> table = new TableView<Person>();
    private final ObservableList<Person> data =
        FXCollections.observableArrayList(
            new Person("Jacob", "Smith", "jacob.smith@example.com"),
            new Person("Isabella", "Johnson", "isabella.johnson@example.com"),
            new Person("Ethan", "Williams", "ethan.williams@example.com"),
            new Person("Emma", "Jones", "emma.jones@example.com"),
            new Person("Michael", "Brown", "michael.brown@example.com")
        );

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        launch(args);
    }

    @Override
    public void start(Stage stage) {
        Scene scene = new Scene(new Group());
        stage.setTitle("Table View Sample");
        stage.setWidth(450);
        stage.setHeight(600);

        final Label label = new Label("Address Book");
        label.setFont(new Font("Arial", 20));

        TableColumn firstNameCol = new TableColumn("First Name");
        firstNameCol.setMinWidth(100);
        firstNameCol.setCellValueFactory(
                new PropertyValueFactory<Person, String>("firstName"));

        TableColumn lastNameCol = new TableColumn("Last Name");
        lastNameCol.setMinWidth(100);
        lastNameCol.setCellValueFactory(
                new PropertyValueFactory<Person, String>("lastName"));

        TableColumn emailCol = new TableColumn("Email");
        emailCol.setMinWidth(200);
        emailCol.setCellValueFactory(
                new PropertyValueFactory<Person, String>("email"));

        table.setItems(data);
        table.getColumns().addAll(firstNameCol, lastNameCol, emailCol);

        final Button btnHighlight = new Button("Highlight selected row");
        btnHighlight.setMaxWidth(Double.MAX_VALUE);
        btnHighlight.setPrefHeight(30);

        btnHighlight.setOnAction(new EventHandler<ActionEvent>(){
            public void handle(ActionEvent e){
                // this is where the CSS should be applied
            }
        });

        final VBox vbox = new VBox();
        vbox.setSpacing(5);
        vbox.setPadding(new Insets(10, 0, 0, 10));
        vbox.getChildren().addAll(label, table, btnHighlight);

        ((Group) scene.getRoot()).getChildren().addAll(vbox);

        stage.setScene(scene);
        stage.show();
    }

    public static class Person {

        private final SimpleStringProperty firstName;
        private final SimpleStringProperty lastName;
        private final SimpleStringProperty email;

        private Person(String fName, String lName, String email) {
            this.firstName = new SimpleStringProperty(fName);
            this.lastName = new SimpleStringProperty(lName);
            this.email = new SimpleStringProperty(email);
        }

        public String getFirstName() {
            return firstName.get();
        }

        public void setFirstName(String fName) {
            firstName.set(fName);
        }

        public String getLastName() {
            return lastName.get();
        }

        public void setLastName(String fName) {
            lastName.set(fName);
        }

        public String getEmail() {
            return email.get();
        }

        public void setEmail(String fName) {
            email.set(fName);
        }
    }
} 

And the application.css from which the "Highlight selected row" button applies the highlightedRow class to the selected table row:

.highlightedRow {
    -fx-background-color: brown;
    -fx-background-insets: 0, 1, 2;
    -fx-background: -fx-accent;
    -fx-text-fill: -fx-selection-bar-text;
}

Edit:

After several hours of trying, the best thing I could come up is this using the code below:

firstNameCol.setCellFactory(new Callback<TableColumn<Person, String>, TableCell<Person, String>>() {
    @Override
    public TableCell<Person, String> call(TableColumn<Person, String> personStringTableColumn) {
        return new TableCell<Person, String>() {
            @Override
            protected void updateItem(String name, boolean empty) {
                super.updateItem(name, empty);
                if (!empty) {
                    if (name.toLowerCase().startsWith("e") || name.toLowerCase().startsWith("i")) {
                        getStyleClass().add("highlightedRow");
                    }
                    setText(name);
                } else {
                    setText("empty");  // for debugging purposes
                }
            }
        };
    }
});

The part I don't really understand is why I can't do that from inside the setOnAction method of the btnHighlight? I also tried refreshing the table afterwards (described here), but it didn't seem to work. Also, my "solution" only works for the firstNameCol column, so does one have to set new cell factory for each column in order to apply a certain style, or is there a smarter solution?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

If you don't want the reusability of the solution I posted above, this is really the same thing but using an anonymous inner class for the row factory instead of a standalone class. Perhaps the code is easier to follow as it's all in one place. It's kind of a hybrid between Jonathan's solution and mine, but will automatically update the highlights without forcing it with a sort.

I used a list of integers so it supports multiple selection, but if you don't need that you could obviously just use an IntegerProperty instead.

Here's the row factory:

    final ObservableList<Integer> highlightRows = FXCollections.observableArrayList();

    table.setRowFactory(new Callback<TableView<Person>, TableRow<Person>>() {
        @Override
        public TableRow<Person> call(TableView<Person> tableView) {
            final TableRow<Person> row = new TableRow<Person>() {
                @Override
                protected void updateItem(Person person, boolean empty){
                    super.updateItem(person, empty);
                    if (highlightRows.contains(getIndex())) {
                        if (! getStyleClass().contains("highlightedRow")) {
                            getStyleClass().add("highlightedRow");
                        }
                    } else {
                        getStyleClass().removeAll(Collections.singleton("highlightedRow"));
                    }
                }
            };
            highlightRows.addListener(new ListChangeListener<Integer>() {
                @Override
                public void onChanged(Change<? extends Integer> change) {
                    if (highlightRows.contains(row.getIndex())) {
                        if (! row.getStyleClass().contains("highlightedRow")) {
                            row.getStyleClass().add("highlightedRow");
                        }
                    } else {
                        row.getStyleClass().removeAll(Collections.singleton("highlightedRow"));
                    }
                }
            });
            return row;
        }
    });

And here are what some buttons might look like:

    final Button btnHighlight = new Button("Highlight");
    btnHighlight.disableProperty().bind(Bindings.isEmpty(table.getSelectionModel().getSelectedIndices()));
    btnHighlight.setOnAction(new EventHandler<ActionEvent>() {
        @Override
        public void handle(ActionEvent event) {
            highlightRows.setAll(table.getSelectionModel().getSelectedIndices());
        }
    });

    final Button btnClearHighlight = new Button("Clear Highlights");
    btnClearHighlight.disableProperty().bind(Bindings.isEmpty(highlightRows));
    btnClearHighlight.setOnAction(new EventHandler<ActionEvent>() {
        @Override
        public void handle(ActionEvent event) {
            highlightRows.clear();
        }
    });
share|improve this answer
    
Works awesome, and yeah, it's easier to understand. I wasn't updating the question status since I was figuring out the tutorial you've linked and after that I've found that your first answer is even better just because it can be (as you've pointed out) reused. And that's what I ended up with - custom row factory that styles the rows without forcing any refresh. And I've also learned something new about the way JavaFX TableView works. Thanks! –  E. Normous Dec 10 '13 at 13:14

How about creating a row factory which exposes an observable list of the indexes of table rows which are to be highlighted? That way you can simply update the list with the indexes you need to highlight: for example by calling the getSelectedIndices() on the selection model and passing it to the list's setAll(...) method.

This could look something like:

import java.util.Collections;

import javafx.beans.value.ChangeListener;
import javafx.beans.value.ObservableValue;
import javafx.collections.FXCollections;
import javafx.collections.ListChangeListener;
import javafx.collections.ObservableList;
import javafx.scene.control.TableRow;
import javafx.scene.control.TableView;
import javafx.util.Callback;


public class StyleChangingRowFactory<T> implements
        Callback<TableView<T>, TableRow<T>> {

    private final String styleClass ;
    private final ObservableList<Integer> styledRowIndices ;
    private final Callback<TableView<T>, TableRow<T>> baseFactory ;

    public StyleChangingRowFactory(String styleClass, Callback<TableView<T>, TableRow<T>> baseFactory) {
        this.styleClass = styleClass ;
        this.baseFactory = baseFactory ;
        this.styledRowIndices = FXCollections.observableArrayList();
    }

    public StyleChangingRowFactory(String styleClass) {
        this(styleClass, null);
    }

    @Override
    public TableRow<T> call(TableView<T> tableView) {

        final TableRow<T> row ;
        if (baseFactory == null) {
            row = new TableRow<>();
        } else {
            row = baseFactory.call(tableView);
        }

        row.indexProperty().addListener(new ChangeListener<Number>() {
            @Override
            public void changed(ObservableValue<? extends Number> obs,
                    Number oldValue, Number newValue) {
                updateStyleClass(row);
            }
        });

        styledRowIndices.addListener(new ListChangeListener<Integer>() {

            @Override
            public void onChanged(Change<? extends Integer> change) {
                updateStyleClass(row);
            }
        });

        return row;
    }

    public ObservableList<Integer> getStyledRowIndices() {
        return styledRowIndices ;
    }

    private void updateStyleClass(TableRow<T> row) {
        final ObservableList<String> rowStyleClasses = row.getStyleClass();
        if (styledRowIndices.contains(row.getIndex()) ) {
            if (! rowStyleClasses.contains(styleClass)) {
                rowStyleClasses.add(styleClass);
            }
        } else {
            // remove all occurrences of styleClass:
            rowStyleClasses.removeAll(Collections.singleton(styleClass));
        }
    }

}

Now you can do

final StyleChangingRowFactory<Person> rowFactory = new StyleChangingRowFactory<>("highlightedRow");
table.setRowFactory(rowFactory);

And in your button's action handler do

    rowFactory.getStyledRowIndices().setAll(table.getSelectionModel().getSelectedIndices());

Because StyleChangingRowFactory wraps another row factory, you can still use it if you already have a custom row factory implementation you want to use. For example:

final StyleChangingRowFactory<Person> rowFactory = new StyleChangingRowFactory<Person>(
        "highlightedRow",
        new Callback<TableView<Person>, TableRow<Person>>() {

            @Override
            public TableRow<Person> call(TableView<Person> tableView) {
                final TableRow<Person> row = new TableRow<Person>();
                ContextMenu menu = new ContextMenu();
                MenuItem removeMenuItem = new MenuItem("Remove");
                removeMenuItem.setOnAction(new EventHandler<ActionEvent>() {
                    @Override
                    public void handle(ActionEvent event) {
                        table.getItems().remove(row.getItem());
                    }
                });
                menu.getItems().add(removeMenuItem);
                row.contextMenuProperty().bind(
                        Bindings.when(row.emptyProperty())
                                .then((ContextMenu) null)
                                .otherwise(menu));
                return row;
            }

        });
table.setRowFactory(rowFactory);

Here is a complete code example.

share|improve this answer
    
In JavaFX8, you could probably rewrite this using a pseudoclass instead of manipulating the style classes directly. I think this would be much more efficient, and probably a bit nicer. –  James_D Dec 5 '13 at 20:26
    
I really appreciate the effort of taking your time and writing a long answer like this, but I was looking for something more comprehensible, a bit cleaner and easier to follow. I've tried your code and it works as expected, now I'm trying to figure out where that "auto-refresh table" thingy is coming from and how to implement it in somewhat simpler form into my code, if possible. –  E. Normous Dec 7 '13 at 15:52
    
The refresh happens because there is a listener registered with the list of row indices which updates the style class for the row whenever the contents of the list change: styledRowIndices.addListener(...); JavaFX is really powered by the observable properties and collections: you can't really get very far without understanding those and there's really very little here other than listening to properties and an observable list for changes. There's a tutorial on properties linkhere[/link]. –  James_D Dec 7 '13 at 17:30
2  
The JavaFX 8 version, using pseudoclasses, is at gist.github.com/james-d/7912548 It is much nicer. –  James_D Dec 11 '13 at 15:37

Here's an ugly hack solution. Firstly, define an int field called highlightedRow. Then set a row factory on the TableView:

table.setRowFactory(new Callback<TableView<Person>, TableRow<Person>>() {
    @Override public TableRow<Person> call(TableView<Person> param) {
        return new TableRow<Person>() {
            @Override protected void updateItem(Person item, boolean empty) {
                super.updateItem(item, empty);

                if (getIndex() == highlightedRow) {
                    getStyleClass().add("highlightedRow");
                } else {
                    getStyleClass().remove("highlightedRow");
                }
            }
        };
    }
});

Then add the following code in your button on action (and this is where the ugly hack comes into play):

btnHighlight.setOnAction(new EventHandler<ActionEvent>(){
    public void handle(ActionEvent e){
        // set the highlightedRow integer to the selection index
        highlightedRow = table.getSelectionModel().getSelectedIndex();

        // force a tableview refresh - HACK
        List<Person> items = new ArrayList<>(table.getItems());
        table.getItems().setAll(items);
    }
});

Once that is done, you get the brown highlight on the selected row. You could of course easily support multiple brown highlights by replacing the int with a list of itns.

share|improve this answer
    
If you use an IntegerProperty instead of a plain int, you can observe the property for changes and get rid of the hack. –  James_D Dec 6 '13 at 3:31
    
I like this answer the most, probably because I can clearly understand what's going on and it's easy to follow. The thing that's not working is that the table doesn't refresh itself (the CSS isn't applied), until I sort it by firstname/lastname/etc. So, the hack doesn't really force a refresh, atleast not in my case. @James_D, I made private SimpleIntegerProperty highlightedRow = new SimpleIntegerProperty(-1), and then I just check if the getIndex() == highlightedRow.get() and apply the CSS style. That seems to work, but again, not until I "manually" refresh the table by sorting it. –  E. Normous Dec 7 '13 at 11:55
    
To avoid the "manual refresh" hack, you need to register a listener with the IntegerProperty and update the row's style class when it changes. –  James_D Dec 7 '13 at 21:45
    
Use more robustnames for CSS classes, like "row-even" and "row-odd" insead of "highlightedRow". That way you can assign different styling to each row besides highlighted/lowlighted. It will help you in the future if you have a requirement to highlight the row user is mousing over. –  ike_love Dec 8 '13 at 4:08

I might have found something that works:

With this code added, if you press the button the highlighted row changes color, when you select a different row the color changes back to default, when you press the button again, it changes the color of the new row to brown.

final String css = getClass().getResource("style.css").toExternalForm();
final Scene scene = new Scene(new Group());


btnHighlight.setOnAction(new EventHandler<ActionEvent>() {
    @Override
     public void handle(ActionEvent e) {
         scene.getStylesheets().add(css);
     }
});
table.getSelectionModel().selectedIndexProperty()
            .addListener(new ChangeListener<Number>() {
    @Override
     public void changed(ObservableValue<? extends Number> ov, Number t, Number t1) {
         scene.getStylesheets().remove(css);
     }
});

css:

.table-row-cell:selected
{
     -fx-background-color: brown;
     -fx-text-inner-color: white;
}

Only problem with this solution is that if you press the button twice in a row, your next row selected is already brown. You would have to use a seperate css file for this, else at startup of the application no css rules would be applied untill you press the button.

share|improve this answer

I found that the best solution would be to listen for row.itemProperty() changes because when you sort for example the rows change indexes, so rows get notified automatically.

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