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I'm trying to write a program that reverses the order of the lines of a text file or files in C.

I don't consider my code the best in terms of optimization, but it's a first approximation.

The idea behind it is, first, check how many lines are in total, counting every file passed as a parameter. Then, create an array of *char of that length to store every single line in order, and finally, just print each element in the array (each line) starting from the last position, so I get them in reversed order.

The code gets to count the number of lines correctly, but I can't find my mistake in the second for loop. Any help would be appreciated. I think the error is in the calloc assignment line or in the strcpy, but I'm not sure.

Here's my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main(int argc, char *argv[], char*envp[]) {

/* variable "lineas" will contain the number of lines in all files */
FILE *fp;

int i;
int lineas = 0;
    /* For every file passed as parameter */
for (i = 1; i < argc; i++)
{
    fp = fopen(argv[i],"r"); // read mode

    /* file does not exist */
    if( fp == NULL )
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "file \"%s\" does not exist.\n", argv[i]);
        return ( 66 );
    }

    else
    {
        char line [2048];
        while ( fgets(line, sizeof line, fp) != NULL )
            lineas++;   
    }
    fclose(fp);
}

fprintf(stdout, "Total lines: %d\n", lineas);

/* We create the array of *char that will contain the lines */
char *lines[lineas];
    *lines = calloc( lineas, 2048 );

/* Now, I TRY to copy every single line into that array */
int j;
int k = 0;
for (j = 1; j < argc; j++)
{
    fp = fopen(argv[j],"r"); // read mode

    /* files are supposed to exist, since we checked in the other for loop */

    char line [2048];
    while ( fgets(line, sizeof line, fp) != NULL )
    {
        strcpy(lines[k], line); 
        k++;
    }
    fclose(fp);
}
    /* now, we proceed to print all lines starting from the last one */
while ( k >= 0 )
{
    fprintf(stdout, "%s", lines[k]);
    k--;
}
free(lines);

return (0);
}
share|improve this question
    
I thought the error could come from not freeing it, but whether it's or not, I get the Segmentation fault thing... – Guimo Dec 3 '13 at 12:00
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is wrong here !

 char *lines[lineas];
 *lines = calloc( lineas, 2048 );

You are creating pointer to array of lines , but not allocating memory to each of these .

you need to change it to

lines[k] =calloc(lineas,2048);

and put it in the while loop before doing strcpy.

share|improve this answer
    
"You are creating pointer to array of lines", don't you mean an array of pointers? :) – Guido Dec 3 '13 at 12:14
    
Yes @Guido , i was referring to lines which is a pointer itself . – Srikanth Dec 3 '13 at 12:15
    
Oh, I see now... Thank you very much. What I did was delete the *lines = calloc( lineas, 2048 ); line and put lines[k] =malloc(2048); where you told me, fixed a problem that I had in my loop for printing too and now it seems to work. Thank you very much! Really appreciate it – Guimo Dec 3 '13 at 12:18

Move the k-- line:

while ( k >= 0 )
{
    k--;
    fprintf(stdout, "%s", lines[k]);
}

I think the allocation of the lines is incorrect:

char *lines[lineas];
    *lines = calloc( lineas, 2048 );

Yeah - that's definitely suspicious. I would have expected something more like this:

char **lines;
lines = calloc( lineas, sizeof(char*) );
for(i=0 ; i < lineas; ++i )
   lines[i] = calloc( 2048, sizeof(char));
share|improve this answer
    
This should not be the reason for seg fault , we might miss one of the files but seg-fault cannot happen – Srikanth Dec 3 '13 at 12:05
    
Mmmmh... I don't think that is the problem since it works. I start it at 1 because I'm using these loops to work with files passed from the console (Ubuntu) as arguments in argv[ X ], and the argv[0] is always the function itself. – Guimo Dec 3 '13 at 12:06
    
Thank you! Wouldn't have found the mistake in my loop in a while. – Guimo Dec 3 '13 at 12:21

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