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I'm learning Java, and in doing so I'm using notepad to write sample code, and using the command line to compile and run programs. I'm using notepad (rather than Eclipse), because I want to increase my chances of being able to memorise syntax, for certification purposes. (And I'm using the command line, because I'm using notepad.) Can someone please critique my project structure, and command line syntax? Thank you.

My Windows folder structure looks like:

\my java files\testprj\src
\my java files\testprj\bat
\my java files\testprj\cls

And inside the src folder (above), I have this structure:

\src\pkgs\project  (this is where the "main() class" file resides)
\src\pkgs\marine
\src\pkgs\mammal

Inside the "main() class" file, I have this code:

package pkgs.project;

import pkgs.marine.Fish;
import pkgs.mammal.Bear;

And inside one of the mammal class files (eg Bear), I have this code:

package pkgs.mammal;

import pkgs.marine.Fish;

public class Bear{
    public void eat(Fish f){
    }
}

In order to compile my project, I have a .bat batch file (located in a folder named bat) that looks like this:

javac -d ..\cls ..\src\pkgs\marine\*.java
javac -cp ..\cls -d ..\cls ..\src\pkgs\mammal\*.java
javac -cp ..\cls -d ..\cls ..\src\pkgs\project\*.java

And I have another .bat batch file, to launch the "main() class" file, which is called MainPrj.

java -cp ..\cls pkgs.project.MainPrj

I have three questions regarding the above information. Thank you.

1 How can I make any of it better? (Or, what mistakes have I made?)

2 Regarding the group of three javac compile lines above, I wasn't able to use the -sourcepath option, without getting syntax errors. Consequently, I realise that I don't understand what -sourcepath allows me to do. Any advice on this issue would be interesting.

3 Regarding the single java execute line above, I wasn't able to specify the "main class name" (called MainPrj) without needing to use it alongside its namespace pkgs.project.MainPrj. Is that normal/correct?

share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by phs, Kevin Panko, Mureinik, Prashant Kumar, Viruss mca Dec 4 '13 at 6:06

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I do not exactly know, if this kind of question is appropriate for stackoverflow.com (others will tell us), but your question is a very good one. It shows your willingness to learn and it also shows that you already did a big step understanding the concepts. So I will try to give some answers.

1 How can I make any of it better? (Or, what mistakes have I made?)

Your project is well structured. You are separating the source files from the binaries. That is very recommended and is also done by Eclipse (and other IDEs also). You are placing your classes in (several) packages, thus avoiding the default package and separating them also. Additionally you place some scripts into another separated directory. Good. There is nothing to complain here.

2 Regarding the group of three javac compile lines above, I wasn't able to use the -sourcepath option, without getting syntax errors. Consequently, I realise that I don't understand what -sourcepath allows me to do. Any advice on this issue would be interesting.

This is the step, where you need more understanding, I think. The main problem for the Java compiler is to lookup classes that are referenced by your source files. In your example your Bear class references your Fish class, and your MainPrj class references both.

Speaking about classes, we must distinguish between sources and binaries. Your Fish class is a source, because it exists as a Java source file. There might be references in your sources to other classes - maybe from the Java runtime or some third-party libraries - that do only exist as binaries.

Only if all references classes - either sources or binaries - are found, the Java compiler can correctly compile your classes. Compilation itself can be considered as a class dependency graph with one entry point. In this case, it is your main class.

Considering this, a good way to compile your program is the following command (from being inside the directry bat):

javac -d ../cls -sourcepath ../src ../src/pkgs/project/MainPrj.java

This sets the compiler to use ../cls as the output directory for the generated class files (option -d). It also tells it to use ../src as the source path. The compiler searches the source path for other source files. This is necessary, because you are referencing the Fish class and the Bear class in your main class, but they only exist as sources. When finding such references, they are compiled also, so that compiling only the main class will automatically compile all dependencies.

You did three steps for compiling, always putting the generated class in the directory ../cls. Afterwards you referenced this directory by placing it into the classpath option (-cp). This is also ok, but will become very complicated with much more classes. Let the Java compiler do its job.

Another option for compiling exists: You can omit the sourcepath option and directly place the list of files as arguments to javac. But this is the same complicated thing as with several javac calls.

You do not need to specify the classpath when specifying the sourcepath, as you are not referencing any third-party library classes yet.

3 Regarding the single java execute line above, I wasn't able to specify the "main class name" (called MainPrj) without needing to use it alongside its namespace pkgs.project.MainPrj. Is that normal/correct?

This is correct behavior, and can't be changed. Classes always must be specified by its fully qualified name (e.g. pkgs.project.MainPrj).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! :) Your explanation was particularly helpful. At last, I understand how (and when and why) to use the -sourcepath switch. – user2911290 Dec 3 '13 at 13:12
    
Glad to help you. – Seelenvirtuose Dec 3 '13 at 13:17

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