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I have two lists of numbers, say [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] and [7, 8, 9, 10, 11], and I would like to form a new list which consists of the products of each member in the first list with each member in the second list. In this case, there would be 5*5 = 25 elements in the new list.

I have been unable to do this so far with a while() loop. This is what I have so far:

x = 0
y = 99
results = []
while x < 5:
    x = x + 1
    results.append(x*y)
while y < 11:
    y = y + 1
    results.append(x*y)
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1  
Could you post what you have so far? –  Simeon Visser Dec 3 '13 at 13:43
    
By the way, how is the result 25 in this case? –  Aswin Murugesh Dec 3 '13 at 13:48
    
I don't understand how you can get 25 from those list. –  aIKid Dec 3 '13 at 13:48
    
@AswinMurugesh He means elements in the resulting set. –  Steve P. Dec 3 '13 at 13:48
2  
he means lists, not sets –  usethedeathstar Dec 3 '13 at 13:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Wht dont you try with known old ways;

list1 = range(1, 100)
list2 = range(10, 50, 5)

new_values = []

for x in list1:
    for y in list2:
        new_values.append(x*y)
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Can you please explain this? Won't this give the same result as my while look (It will only multiply all x values with a single y value) –  Aniruddh Agarwal Dec 3 '13 at 13:58
    
No, It will grab the first x and multiply it with all y values. Then grab the second x and multiply that will all y values etc... –  FallenAngel Dec 3 '13 at 14:00
    
So basically, the outer loop will run once and then the inner loop will keep on running until it's finished? –  Aniruddh Agarwal Dec 3 '13 at 14:04
    
No, Outer loop will start its first run and it will consume all list2 values. Then list1 will grab its second value and consume all list2 values (again). Then list1 will grab its third value etc until list1 all used up. –  FallenAngel Dec 3 '13 at 14:24
    
That's what I meant :P –  Aniruddh Agarwal Dec 3 '13 at 15:25

Use itertools.product to generate all possible 2-tuples, then calculate the product of that:

[x * y for (x, y) in itertools.product([1,2,3,4,5], [7,8,9,10,11])]
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But that will not work if I have to multiply more numbers (like all numbers between 1 and 1000?) –  Aniruddh Agarwal Dec 3 '13 at 13:52
    
@AniruddhAgarwal What do you mean by that? This will definitely work for any two lists... –  Steve P. Dec 3 '13 at 13:52
    
@SteveP nevermind, it was a misunderstanding. –  Aniruddh Agarwal Dec 3 '13 at 13:54
    
@AniruddhAgarwal If you say you want all numbers between 1 and 1000, do you mean without duplicates or with duplicates? –  usethedeathstar Dec 3 '13 at 13:55

The problem is an example of an outer product. The answer already posted with itertools.product is the way I would do this as well.

But here's an alternative with numpy, which is usually more efficient than working in pure python for crunching numeric data.

>>> import numpy as np
>>> x1 = np.array([1,2,3,4,5])
>>> x2 = np.array([7,8,9,10,11])
>>> np.outer(x1,x2)
array([[ 7,  8,  9, 10, 11],
       [14, 16, 18, 20, 22],
       [21, 24, 27, 30, 33],
       [28, 32, 36, 40, 44],
       [35, 40, 45, 50, 55]])
>>> np.ravel(np.outer(x1,x2))
array([ 7,  8,  9, 10, 11, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 21, 24, 27, 30, 33, 28, 32,
       36, 40, 44, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55])
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or instead of outer, you could do x1[:,None]*x2[None,:] (i guess this is more general since its easy to expand to x1*x2*x3*..., while i guess np.outer doesnt work with more than 2 arguments (correct me if im wrong on that one?) –  usethedeathstar Dec 3 '13 at 13:56
    
Would be interesting to let the timeit module benachmark this vs. the other proposed solutions. Unfortunately I don't have numpy here to do it myself. –  Frerich Raabe Dec 3 '13 at 13:59
    
I think the comprehension will be faster for this small example, and numpy will overtake it for big data –  wim Dec 3 '13 at 14:02

Without any importing, you can do:

[x * y for x in range(1, 6) for y in range(7, 12)]

or alternatively:

[[x * y for x in range(1, 6)] for y in range(7, 12)]

To split out the different multiples, but it depends which order you want the results in.

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Eeek, nested list (in-)comprehensions! %-} –  Frerich Raabe Dec 3 '13 at 13:58
    
Easily comprehensible in this case, since the loops commute –  wim Dec 3 '13 at 13:59
from functools import partial

mult = lambda x, y: x * y

l1 = [2,3,4,5,5]
l2 = [5,3,23,4,4]

results = []

for n in l1:
    results.extend( map( partial(mult, n) , l2) )

print results
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