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I am trying to build a query, but I am having some difficulty.

I have a SQL Server 2008 database with a table that includes, among other fields, a geography field that describes road segments. (This data has been imported from TIGER/Line data from the U.S. Census.)

I have another fixed point describing a user's location. I want to find the closest road segment in the database to that point, but I can't seem to figure out how to accomplish this. Furthermore, I want to find the closest point on that segment to the user location point. This is what I want to select and return back in my query.

Does anyone have any experience with the geography/geometry functionality that can help me?

Thanks!

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You might want to add some field type information. For example, you have a fixed point to describe the user's location, is this a Longitude and Latitude coordinate pair? I have experience with the geography functions, but need more details... –  Sparky Jan 9 '10 at 23:22
    
I'm providing this from my application, so I'm passing in an argument. I'm fine with pretty much whatever data type is necessary. –  David Pfeffer Jan 9 '10 at 23:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You can store your objects in a GEOGRAPHY column and create a SPATIAL INDEX over this column.

Unfortunately, SQL Server implements spatial indexes by tiling the surface and storing the tile identifiers in a plain B-Tree index, so plain ORDER BY STDistance won't work (well, it will work but won't use the index).

Instead, you'll have to make a query similar to this:

DECLARE @mypoint GEOGRAPHY
SET @mypoint = geography::STGeomFromText('POINT(@mylat, @mylon)', 4326);

WITH    num (distance) AS
        (
        SELECT  1000
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  distance + 1000
        FROM    num
        WHERE   distance <= 50000
        )
SELECT  TOP 1 m.*
FROM    num
CROSS APPLY
        (
        SELECT  TOP 1 *
        FROM    mytable
        WHERE   myroad.STDistance(@mypoint) <= distance
        ORDER BY
                STDistance(@mypoint)
        ) m

This way, SQL Server will first search roads within 1 kilometer from your point, then within 2 kilometers, etc., each time using the index.

Update:

If you have multiple points in a table and want to find the closest point for each of them:

WITH    num (distance) AS
        (
        SELECT  1000
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  distance + 1000
        FROM    num
        WHERE   distance <= 50000
        )
SELECT  mp.mypoint, m.*
FROM    @mypoints mp
CROSS APPLY
        (
        SELECT  TOP 1 m.*
        FROM    num
        CROSS APPLY
                (
                SELECT  TOP 1 *
                FROM    mytable
                WHERE   myroad.STDistance(@mypoint) <= distance
                ORDER BY
                        STDistance(@mypoint)
                ) m
        ) m
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2  
Best answer I think I've ever encountered on StackOverflow. Thanks for letting me know not to just ORDER BY, which is probably what I would have ended up implementing. –  David Pfeffer Jan 10 '10 at 16:05
    
@Pure: just cross apply my query to @mypoints –  Quassnoi Jun 30 '11 at 9:34
    
hi. I'm not sure if @Pure Krome figured it out, but I can't seem to get it. Cross Apply my query to @myPoints ?? I don't get it :( Can you please update your answer, please??? –  RPM1984 Jul 1 '11 at 1:10
    
Great answer, but doesn't answer the whole OP question. Once you have the closest road what is the point on that road which is closest to the point? –  Jason Steele Mar 9 '13 at 19:36
    
Just found this blogs.msdn.com/b/edkatibah/archive/2010/11/19/… which will give you this. –  Jason Steele Mar 9 '13 at 19:52

How are your road segments stored? lat and long? if so, you can convert them to radians, and do the math:

share|improve this answer
    
The segments are stored in the Geography data type. –  David Pfeffer Jan 10 '10 at 0:45

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