Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Suppose there are 4 sets:

s1={1,2,3,4};
s2={2,3,4};
s3={2,3,4,5};
s4={1,3,4,5};

Is there any standard metric to present the similarity degree of this group of 4 sets?

Thank you for the suggestion of Jaccard method. However, it seems pairwise. How can I compute the similarity degree of the whole group of sets?

share|improve this question
    
It entirely depends on what you want to do with your set of set similarity measure. Will you compare them to sets of more than 4 sets, or always 4? Are you trying to partition or cluster many sets? – Tobu Jan 10 '10 at 0:23

Pairwise, you can compute the Jaccard distance of two sets. It's simply the distance between two sets, if they were vectors of booleans in a space where {1, 2, 3…} are all unit vectors.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1, and probably the mean of the (6) Jaccard coefficients is what @Soup is looking for. – Nick Dandoulakis Jan 9 '10 at 23:41
    
Seconding your idea of taking the mean. – Tobu Jan 9 '10 at 23:52

Your question isn't very specific. But I suppose you mean something like the "edit distance" between them? I.e. how much you need to change s1 to get to s2?

Check out the Wikipedia article on Edit distance.

share|improve this answer

As Tobu said I'd use the Jaccard Index which is just the intersection divided by the union of the sets.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for cleaning up the link Nick D – Aly Jan 9 '10 at 23:47

you could compute the size of the intersection between each set

share|improve this answer

You could compute the Euclidean distance between them, and build a dendrogram from that to visualize similarity.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.