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This Django ticket says that they will not add a default Django template file extension. What file extension do you use?

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I wish they would fix it, too (choose an ext). I can't get my editor (Kate) to load django templates with the right highlighting by default. –  JAL Jan 9 '10 at 23:32

6 Answers 6

For HTML pages: .html
For XML data (RSS and such): .xml
Etc

Just because they're templates doesn't mean they should have some sort of special extension.

As mentioned in the ticket:

  1. You already know the files are templates because they should be in a template directory
  2. You don't want to have to open up files to see what they are (HTML, CSS, XML, etc). You would have to do this with a generic extension like .djt.
  3. Most editors get this right with the proper filetype extension anyways so there is little reason to change this convention.
  4. However, something like .djt could allow for Django specific icons and syntax types.
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+1 except for maybe #4. There's no need for new magic here. Vim and Notepad++ already know about Django template tag highlighting so it may not even be necessary for a .djt extension. This ain't Rocket Surgery. –  Peter Rowell Jan 10 '10 at 4:12

I honestly believe we need a standard extension for django template files. A template is NOT valid CSS/HTML/XML or anything else.

Nick Presta wrote:

  1. You already know the files are templates because they should be in a template directory
  2. You don't want to have to open up files to see what they are (HTML, CSS, XML, etc). You would have to do this with a generic extension like .djt.

Point #2 can also be used in favor of a default extension or a mix (like .html.djt). Without a differentiated extension, you need to open a file in order to know it's a django template and not a regular (e.g. HTML) file.

And point #1 is just plain wrong, considering that they are not always in a template directory.

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Ruby on Rails uses .html.erb for erb templates, something similar will work for Django too.

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It's actually the other way around (.html.erb): ruby-forum.com/topic/120053 –  Joe Jan 12 '11 at 2:56

Personaly I use .dj.html

Like that I know what is inside and my editor knows that it contains django template language.

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.djt

It's short and shows that the template is Django specific.

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I use the same name I would use for this file, if it wasn't a template. Thanks to this, I instantly know, what to expect inside. And for me every file that is being served is through views is a template, it sometimes just isn't filled with anything or even doesn't use markup language.

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