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I found a post on Stackoverflow, Capturing Sound for Analysis and Visualizing Frequencies in Android, that teaches code to display a graph of the audio frequency.

But I am struggling to figure out how to display the text of the frequency below the graph.

For FFT, a package which implements the FFT is linked here www.netlib.org/fftpack/jfftpack.tgz

The code to create the graph is below:

import android.app.Activity;
import android.graphics.Bitmap;
import android.graphics.Canvas;
import android.graphics.Color;
import android.graphics.Paint;
import android.media.AudioFormat;
import android.media.AudioRecord;
import android.media.MediaRecorder;
import android.os.AsyncTask;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.util.Log;
import android.view.Menu;
import android.view.View;
import android.view.View.OnClickListener;
import android.widget.Button;
import android.widget.ImageView;
import android.widget.TextView;

//code influenced by posting on stackoverflow.com
//http://stackoverflow.com/questions/5511250/capturing-sound-for-analysis-and-  visualizing-frequencies-in-android?rq=1

public class MainActivity extends Activity implements OnClickListener {

int frequency = 8000;
int channelConfiguration = AudioFormat.CHANNEL_CONFIGURATION_MONO;
int audioEncoding = AudioFormat.ENCODING_PCM_16BIT;
private RealDoubleFFT transformer;
int blockSize = 256;

Button startStopButton;
boolean started = false;

RecordAudio recordTask;

ImageView imageView;
Bitmap bitmap;
Canvas canvas;
Paint paint;

private TextView aTextView;



//AudioRecord audioRecord;

@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);

    startStopButton = (Button) this.findViewById(R.id.StartStopButton);
    startStopButton.setOnClickListener(this);

    transformer = new RealDoubleFFT(blockSize);

    imageView = (ImageView) this.findViewById(R.id.ImageView01);
    bitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap((int) 256, (int) 100,
            Bitmap.Config.ARGB_8888);
    canvas = new Canvas(bitmap);
    paint = new Paint();
    paint.setColor(Color.GREEN);
    imageView.setImageBitmap(bitmap);

    aTextView = (TextView)findViewById(R.id.frequency_text);

}

public class RecordAudio extends AsyncTask<Void, double[], Void> {

    @Override
    protected Void doInBackground(Void... arg0) {

        try {
            // int bufferSize = AudioRecord.getMinBufferSize(frequency,
            // AudioFormat.CHANNEL_IN_MONO, AudioFormat.ENCODING_PCM_16BIT);
            int bufferSize = AudioRecord.getMinBufferSize(frequency, 
                    channelConfiguration, audioEncoding); 

            AudioRecord audioRecord = new AudioRecord( 
                    MediaRecorder.AudioSource.MIC, frequency, 
                    channelConfiguration, audioEncoding, bufferSize); 

            short[] buffer = new short[blockSize];
            double[] toTransform = new double[blockSize];

            audioRecord.startRecording();

            // started = true; hopes this should true before calling
            // following while loop

            while (started) {
                int bufferReadResult = audioRecord.read(buffer, 0,
                        blockSize);

                for (int i = 0; i < blockSize && i < bufferReadResult; i++) {
                    toTransform[i] = (double) buffer[i] / 32768.0; // signed
                                                                    // 16
                }                                       // bit
                    transformer.ft(toTransform);
                    publishProgress(toTransform);



            }

            audioRecord.stop();

        } catch (Throwable t) {
            t.printStackTrace();
            Log.e("AudioRecord", "Recording Failed");
        }
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    protected void onProgressUpdate(double[]... toTransform) {

        canvas.drawColor(Color.BLACK);

        for (int i = 0; i < toTransform[0].length; i++) {
            int x = i;
            int downy = (int) (100 - (toTransform[0][i] * 10));
            int upy = 100;

            canvas.drawLine(x, downy, x, upy, paint);

        }

        imageView.invalidate();

        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        // super.onProgressUpdate(values);
    }

}

@Override
public boolean onCreateOptionsMenu(Menu menu) {
    getMenuInflater().inflate(R.menu.main, menu);
    return true;
}

public void onClick(View arg0) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    if (started) {
        started = false;
        startStopButton.setText("Start");
        recordTask.cancel(true);
    } else {
        started = true;
        startStopButton.setText("Stop");
        recordTask = new RecordAudio();
        recordTask.execute();
    }
}
}
share|improve this question
1  
The text of which frequency? That is going to be hard question you need to think on. – Chris Stratton Dec 3 '13 at 15:13
    
AUDIO frequency. Sorry about that. :) – Daniel Semel Dec 3 '13 at 17:36
    
which audio frequency? Most of the work will be in turning the array of bin components or magnitudes from the FFT into a decision about which audio frequency you should display. – Chris Stratton Dec 3 '13 at 17:37
    
Isn't there a general audio frequency coming from the microphone on an Android device? – Daniel Semel Dec 3 '13 at 18:16
    
No. There is not - and it has nothing to do with Android, but is a general program of audio analysis. Figuring out which of the many frequency components you find with the FFT is of interest to your user is going to be the hard challenge you will have to solve before you can write this program. – Chris Stratton Dec 3 '13 at 19:32

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