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If CSS and HTML are both case-insensitive languages(*), and the W3C says

The case-sensitivity of attribute names and values in selectors depends on the document language.

How can I reconcile that with attribute values being case sensitive in selectors? For instance,

div[title=TITLE] {color:green}

does not make the text green for this HTML:

<div title="title">This is a div</div>

Fiddle here.

Is this a bug in the browser? And when I say "the browser", I mean all of them. Or am I looking at an unfinished version of the CSS3 specs? Which would be strange, as the same line of text was also in the CSS2 specs here.

(*) except for some features that are explicit exceptions, like class and ID names. Note that this example does not have class or ID names.

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2  
Selectors 3 has been a recommendation for years now. I would say that it is finalized. This statement is unchanged in Selectors 4 even outside of the new case-insensitive toggle. – BoltClock Dec 3 '13 at 15:02
    
As for classes and IDs, see stackoverflow.com/questions/12533926/… – BoltClock Dec 3 '13 at 15:11
up vote 9 down vote accepted

HTML5 actually contains an entire section dedicated to case-sensitivity for the purposes of selector matching. Here's what it says about attribute names and values:

Attribute and element names of HTML elements in HTML documents must be treated as ASCII case-insensitive for the purposes of selector matching.

Everything else (attribute values on HTML elements, IDs and classes in no-quirks mode and limited-quirks mode, and element names, attribute names, and attribute values in XML documents) must be treated as case-sensitive for the purposes of selector matching.

Of course, HTML 4 does not state anything about interop with selectors, but it does say that the title attribute in particular is case-sensitive. Since selectors depend on the document language for determining case-sensitivity, there is no difference here.

XHTML follows the same set of rules as XML does: all attribute values should be case-sensitive, so a selector must follow that case-sensitivity. Again, no difference.

So what you're seeing is entirely by design; there is no browser or spec issue.

share|improve this answer
    
OK. Now when testing, I did find some anomalies in how browsers handle case sensitivity in attribute values in XHTML markup; but that's outside of the scope of this question. Anyway, I couldn't see where the HTML4 spec says title is case sensitive, but that could be just me. – Mr Lister Dec 3 '13 at 15:29
    
@Mr Lister: "title = text [CS]" CS stands for case-sensitive. – BoltClock Dec 3 '13 at 15:30
    
OK! So to recap, I just happened to be testing with the wrong attribute! title happens to be just as case sensitive as id and class. That was my mistake. An updated fiddle shows that the other attribute I mentioned, method, does get the CSS applied if the cases don't match. – Mr Lister Dec 3 '13 at 18:29
    
@Mr Lister: method is [CI] w3.org/TR/html401/interact/forms.html#adef-method which means case-insensitive, so it does appear that browsers are following the original specs as they used to. Whether HTML5 intends to change the rules like this (making all attribute values case-sensitive for selector matching) is beyond me since doing so would break tons of pages, however. – BoltClock Dec 4 '13 at 5:22
    
That's what I meant, yes. I didn't know any better or only id and class were case sensitive, so this was kind of a revelation. I should have looked at the specs more carefully. Anyway, I don't think you need to worry about HTML5 breaking existing pages; the browsers have always worked very hard at keeping their backwards compatibility; and if that means breaking the formal rules, then so be it. – Mr Lister Dec 4 '13 at 6:05

You answered your own question:

The case-sensitivity of attribute names and values in selectors depends on the document language.

But further, I believe it is because to the browser, it and IT are not the same string. They are two different things to the browser.

EDIT--- You brought up something good in your comment. Let me explain: The HTML/CSS parser reads HTML and CSS as case-insensitive. That is because they are. But attributes are not, because they are defined by the user. So, it reads them as case-sensitive. Basically, HTML and CSS are standardized. Attributes are not.

EDITED AGAIN--- HTTP methods are standardized, (I Think) thus making it not necessary for them to be case-sensitive.

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Yes, but HTML and CSS are case insensitive! In fact, the same example does work if you write the tag name or the attribute name in uppercase. it's just the attribute value that has this issue. – Mr Lister Dec 3 '13 at 14:55
1  
That makes sense. Because it's an actual value and not markup, it should be case-sensitive. I wouldn't want doGS and dogs to be equal. – DevlshOne Dec 3 '13 at 14:59
    
Also, in the markup, those values are always case insensitive. You can write <form method="POST"... and it will work, even in XHTML which is supposed to be case sensitive. So why would CSS think otherwise? – Mr Lister Dec 3 '13 at 15:00
1  
This answer seems to imply that it is entirely up to the browser - while it is, that doesn't automatically mean that there is no notion of conformance to some sort of spec, unless evidence exists that demonstrates otherwise (e.g. it is not defined in any spec how it should work). – BoltClock Dec 3 '13 at 15:20
2  
Also: "But attributes are not, because they are defined by the user. So, it reads them as case-sensitive. Basically, HTML and CSS are standardized. Attributes are not." This is incorrect unless you're only referring to non-standard attributes. HTML has very clear definitions on which attributes are case-sensitive and which are not (HTML5 even accounts for custom data attributes). Even if you were referring to non-standard attributes, title is not one such attribute. – BoltClock Dec 3 '13 at 15:28

Strings in attribute selectors are matched case-sensitively in HTML, and that’s pretty much that. I don’t know why they wouldn’t be – take name for example. name="foo" and name="FoO" get sent to the server differently, after all. Even ids are case-sensitive if you want them to be; this works fine and validates, and it seems like it should according to the spec (but I wouldn’t trust it to work everywhere).

See the specification (the relevant bit is in HTML’s spec, not CSS’s):

The Selectors specification leaves the case-sensitivity of IDs, classes, element names, attribute names, and attribute values to be defined by the host language. [SELECTORS]

The unique identifier of HTML elements in documents that are in quirks mode must be treated as ASCII case-insensitive for the purposes of selector matching.

Classes from the class attribute of HTML elements in documents that are in quirks mode must be treated as ASCII case-insensitive for the purposes of selector matching.

When comparing a CSS element type selector to the names of HTML elements in HTML documents, the CSS element type selector must first be converted to ASCII lowercase. The same selector when compared to other elements must be compared according to its original case. In both cases, the comparison is case-sensitive.

When comparing the name part of a CSS attribute selector to the names of namespace-less attributes on HTML elements in HTML documents, the name part of the CSS attribute selector must first be converted to ASCII lowercase. The same selector when compared to other attributes must be compared according to its original case. In both cases, the comparison is case-sensitive.

Everything else (attribute values on HTML elements, IDs and classes in no-quirks mode and limited-quirks mode, and element names, attribute names, and attribute values in XML documents) must be treated as case-sensitive for the purposes of selector matching.

share|improve this answer
    
No, no. If you change the CSS in the fiddle to read DIV[TITLE=title] {color:green}, it does make the text green. So it's just how CSS responds to attribute values. – Mr Lister Dec 3 '13 at 14:57
    
@MrLister: Er, yes. Sorry if I wasn’t clear. – Ryan O'Hara Dec 3 '13 at 14:58
    
@MrLister: I added the spec, if that helps. – Ryan O'Hara Dec 3 '13 at 15:10

is will be displayed in a monospaced font. The first four spaces will be stripped off, but all other whitespace will be preserved.

Markdown and HTML are turned off in code blocks:
<i>This is not italic</i>, and [this is not a link](http://example.com)

To create not a block, but an inline code span, use backticks:

The $ character is just a shortcut for window.jQuery.

If you want to have a preformatted block within a list, indent by eight spaces:

  1. This is normal text.
  2. So is this, but now follows a code block:

    Skip a line and indent eight spaces.
    That's four spaces for the list
    and four to trigger the code block.
    
share|improve this answer

Some newer browsers support this syntax

div[title=TITLE i] { color:green; }

or

div[title=TITLE I] { color:green; }

which both match this DIV:

<div title="title">This is a div</div>

Note : Support: version : Chrome >= 49.0, Firefox (Gecko) >= 47.0, Safari >= 9

share|improve this answer
    
This isn't widely supported. Your "latest browser" is Chrome only. – Mr Lister Mar 17 at 13:02
    
this is supported in all latest browsers Support: version : Chrome >= 49.0, Firefox (Gecko) >= 47.0, Safari >= 9 – ankit Mar 22 at 9:34
    
Sorry, but you can't honestly expect ordinary people to have Firefox Aurora installed on their machines. The current Firefox is at v45. Oh, and you didn't mention Edge. – Mr Lister Mar 22 at 12:12

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