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I've spent hours with this but haven't managed...

Please see example below - How can this be done?

The idea is to build a compiled expression of type Func<dynamic, dynamic> given an Expression<Func<T1,T2>> passed by the class' consumer. I have been able to solve this problem (thanks to SO) IF the types T1 and T2 are known at design time. But I'm looking for a solution for the case in which T1 and T2 are NOT known at design time.

Is this possible?

Thanks a lot!

public class ExpressionExample
{
    private Func<dynamic, dynamic> _compiledExpression;

    public ExpressionExample(LambdaExpression lambdaExpression)
    {
        // How does one get a compiled expression of type
        // Func<dynamic, dynamic> at this point given lambdaExpression?
    }
}
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lambdaExpression is supposed to be of type Expression<Func<T1, T2>> and we want to extract a delegate of type Func<dynamic, dynamic> (my original text is not being displayed correctly). –  d.. Jan 10 '10 at 0:09
    
Thanks for correcting this, Jon! –  d.. Jan 10 '10 at 0:10
1  
Are you using dynamic to indicate C# 4.0 dynamic or just in the general sense of the word "dynamic"? –  Jason Jan 10 '10 at 0:13
    
"dynamic" as in C# 4.0 –  d.. Jan 10 '10 at 0:14
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Unless I'm not understanding your question, this should work:

public class ExpressionExample<T1, T2>
{
    private Func<dynamic, dynamic> _compiledExpression;

    public ExpressionExample(
        Expression<Func<T1, T2>> lambdaExpression)
    {
        // How does one get a compiled expression of type
        // Func<dynamic, dynamic> at this point given lambdaExpression?
        var func = lambdaExpression.Compile();
        _compiledExpression = (dynamic x) => (dynamic)func((T1)x);
    }
}
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I assume that he doesn't want to change the function's signature. If he can, this is the best solution. –  SLaks Jan 10 '10 at 1:08
    
Hi guys, this is exactly what I was looking for! Thanks a lot, I really appreciate it. I can't believe I spent so much time with this to not even come close to the solution. But well, I learnt quite a lot along the way too. –  d.. Jan 10 '10 at 1:34
    
No problem. Don't forget to mark my answer as accepted :) –  Jacob Jan 10 '10 at 2:41
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You'll need to call Compile on the LambdaExpression, then build and compile another expression tree that calls the delegate using Expression.Invoke(Expression, params Expression).

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The problem is the second tree needs to include type conversions, otherwise the call to the delegate fails; I don't know the types at design time and the compiler tells me that it can not "infer those from usage"... –  d.. Jan 10 '10 at 0:18
    
You need to build the tree at runtime. You might also need to call Expression.Convert. –  SLaks Jan 10 '10 at 0:28
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I was looking in to something similar myself. Being a newbie I won't attempt to answer your question in full but maybe you can find the answer from the answer given to me from forums.asp.net which I also posted right here on stackoverflow.

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