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I posted a question a while back about this but I figured I would start a new thread as the code has changed entirely. I am trying to store a byte string into a memory address created by malloc. When executing the program from terminal I get:

Loaded into eax: 49

I have been following the Intel manual(pdf) exactly as said (or atleast I think). Page 175 for General Purpose Register String Instructions.

    .global main
str: .string "Loaded into eax: %d\n"
one: .string "1"

pushl   $4          #push size of malloc
call    malloc      #call malloc
popl    %ecx        #clear malloc size off of stack
movl    %eax, %edi  #move address to destination
movl    %edi, %ecx  #
movb    one, %al    #move a 1 into %al
stosb               #store the 1 in %al to the address in destination
movl    %ecx, %esi  #move address to source for lodsb
movl    $0, %eax     #clear eax register
lodsb               #load content of (%esi) into %eax
pushl   %eax        #push that content onto stack
pushl   $str        #push string format onto stack
call    printf      #call printf
popl    %ecx        #clear stack
popl    %ecx        #clear stack
share|improve this question
Off the top of my head, doesn't stosb change the value of edi? – zwol Dec 3 '13 at 16:13
@Zack is right. you're storing to the first byte of the malloc'ed buffer, then loading from the second byte. – Wumpus Q. Wumbley Dec 3 '13 at 16:14
Im not sure I understand what you guys mean. Aren't I storing a one? in the address of edi? Where am I only storing the first byte and I can't seem to find anywhere in manual that says stosb changes value of edi? – CodeLikeBananas Dec 3 '13 at 16:20
stosb increments edi, which you then place in esi and use for reading from memory. So you're reading from the byte after where you placed the '1'. – Michael Dec 3 '13 at 16:21
I am getting 49 because one is 49 in ascii – CodeLikeBananas Dec 3 '13 at 16:44

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