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I have a string of digits that's supposed to have 9 characters and I have a regex that replaces the string with the same string and some spaces; something like this:

TheString = '123456789';
TheSpacedString = TheString.replace(/(\d{1})(\d{2})(\d{2})(\d{2})(\d{2})/, '$1 $2 $3 $4 $5');
TheSpacedString format is now '1 23 45 67 89'

The problem is that when the length of the string is not 9, the formatting doesn't work: for instance, if we have this:

TheString = '12345';
TheSpacedString = TheString.replace(/(\d{1})(\d{2})(\d{2})(\d{2})(\d{2})/, '$1 $2 $3 $4 $5');
format should be '1 23 45'

But instead, the string is just '12345'. What's the problem with my regex? The jsFiddle is here

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1  
Your regex doesn't match - so of course it does nothing. –  Matt Burland Dec 3 '13 at 16:56
2  
You should add validation before you perform your replacement - if you're expecting 9 digits but don't get 9, shouldn't that be an error first? –  SpikeX Dec 3 '13 at 17:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Make the last two groups (or however many you think should be optional) optional with ?

http://jsfiddle.net/yWSR2/3/

TheSpacedString = TheString.replace(/(\d{1})(\d{2})(\d{2})(\d{2})?(\d{2})?/, '$1 $2 $3 $4 $5');
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Oh wow, thanks, fixed my day! Upvoted!! Actually, I added a question mark after each block and it works perfectly!! –  frenchie Dec 3 '13 at 16:59
2  
Though it will add some trailing spaces like: "1 23 45 " better to call .trim() after this. –  anubhava Dec 3 '13 at 17:02
    
@anubhava: A very good point. –  Matt Burland Dec 3 '13 at 18:11

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