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Here is the typical IDisposable implementation that I believe is recommended:

~SomeClass() {
    Dispose(false);
}

public void Dispose() {
    GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    Dispose(true);
}

protected virtual void Dispose(bool isDisposing) {
    if(isDisposing) {
        // Dispose managed resources that implement IDisposable.
    }
    // Release unmanaged resources.
}

Now, to my understanding, the idea behind the finalizer there is that if I don't call Dispose, my unmanaged resources will be released properly still. However, to my knowledge, it is generally agreed upon that not calling Dispose on an object that implements IDisposable is probably a bug.

Is there a particular reason not to fully embrace this and do this instead?

~SomeClass() {
    throw new NotImplementedException("Dispose should always be called on this object.");
}

public virtual void Dispose() {
    GC.SuppressFinalize(this);

    // Dispose managed resources that implement IDisposable.

    // Release unmanaged resources.
}
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2  
If you do that, you'll bring down the whole process with no way to handle the exception. Why not use a Debug.Fail statement instead? –  Richard Deeming Dec 3 '13 at 18:09
1  
I do not want to handle the exception. Not calling Dispose should be a big broken thing that immediately is fixed. –  Kelsie Dec 3 '13 at 18:12
1  
I'm tempted to close it as opinion based: I'd expect about 50/50 split on terminate on unexpected failure vs. be nice to users of your library even if they failed to use API appropriately. –  Alexei Levenkov Dec 3 '13 at 18:12
    
I'd really like to hear if there are any opinions I'm not aware of though? –  Kelsie Dec 3 '13 at 18:13
    
Consider Debug.Assert instead of an exception. Paired with some way to force GC it will give you relatively reliable way to trigger the issue while debugging and keep nice behavior in release builds. –  Alexei Levenkov Dec 3 '13 at 18:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From .NET 2.0 and on, An unhandled Exception thrown in a Finalizer causes the process to terminate if the default policy is not overridden.

To my understanding, a Finalizer is not an expected location where an Exception should be thrown. I think it is possible for a Dispose() method not to have been called for an unexpected reason (Thread abort, ...) from which a clean recovery is still possible, provided that the Finalizer executes properly.

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Will the debugger not halt on it at least? –  Kelsie Dec 3 '13 at 18:11
    
Okay. And what if that's desirable? If there's a problem this would draw attention to it, rather than sweeping it under the rug. Seems appropriate enough. –  Servy Dec 3 '13 at 18:11
1  
I certainly don't want it to keep working and nobody realize it's broken. –  Kelsie Dec 3 '13 at 18:11
    
@Kelsie, don't rely on a finalizer to tell you something is wrong, the finalizer is not guaranteed to be executed. –  dcastro Dec 3 '13 at 18:14
    
A finalizer is certainly not guaranteed to be executed at any particular time, but are you saying that in the lifecycle of an application, it might just completely not do it at all? –  Kelsie Dec 3 '13 at 18:14

Throwing an exception in a finalizer is almost always a bad idea. Even though there may be situations where it would in fact achieve the desired result (causing the programmer to be notified of a problem without messing up anything else), a finalizer would have no way of knowing when that would be the case. A better approach would be to have a method which will indicate (perhaps by throwing any exception) whether any objects have been wrongfully abandoned; one may call that method at the end of the program, or perhaps at times when new objects are created. This might cause an exception to get thrown in a part of the code which had nothing to do with the particular instance that was abandoned, but that would still likely be better than throwing the exception in a finalizer context.

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Throwing an exception from a finalizer is one of the worst things you could ever do. It can cause several different kinds of behavior. The exception could cause the ExecutionEngine to crash thereby bringing down your entire process, you could block the finalizer causing an OutOfMemory (OOM) crash, etc. Don't forget that the finalizer runs on a single thread and is one of the most important threads - you don't want it to get screwed up.

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