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I am going through Nicola Josuttis's OOP in C++ book and experimenting with his code using Code Blocks IDE. I am having difficulty understanding the compiler error message. I created a simple class interface (frac1.hpp), a class (frac1.cpp), and a test with main() - (ftest.cpp). The class accepts two integers which is printed out as a fraction. The class constructors set a default of 0 if called w/o any arguments, an integer value if called with 1 argument, or a fraction if called with 2 arguments. If one or two arguments are passed there is no compile error. But if no arguments are passed I expected the constructor to be initialized to 0, instead I get a compiler error about the print statement being of "non-class type". It is as though the object wasn't created. Any help or explanation of what I am doing wrong is greatly appreciated. thank you kindly for your consideration.

Class description:

//frac1.cpp
#include "frac1.hpp"
#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

//default constructor
Fraction::Fraction()  : numer(0), denom(1)  //initialize fraction to 0
{
    //no further statements
}

Fraction::Fraction(int n) : numer(n), denom(1) //whole integer initialization
{
    //no further statements
}

Fraction::Fraction(int n, int d) : numer(n), denom(d)
{
    if (d==0) {
        std::cerr << "error: denominator is 0" <<std::endl;
        std::exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
}
void Fraction::print()
{
    std::cout<<numer<<'/'<<denom<<std::endl;
}

Interface Description:

//frac1.hpp 
#ifndef FRAC1_HPP_INCLUDED
#define FRAC1_HPP_INCLUDED
#include <istream>
#include <cstdlib>

namespace CPPDemo {
    // Fraction Class
    class Fraction {
    private:
        int numer, denom;
    public:
        Fraction();
        Fraction(int);
        Fraction(int,int);

        void print();
    };
}   
#endif // FRAC1_HPP_INCLUDED

test file description:

//ftest.cpp
#include "frac1.hpp"
#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

int main()
{
    CPPDemo::Fraction y();
    y.print();  //flagged as compiler error**
}

Message from Compiler:

C:\Users\User\Desktop\CPPDemo\FractionClassTest\ftest.cpp:9: error: request for member 'print' in 'y', which is of non-class type 'CPPDemo::Fraction()'

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marked as duplicate by jrok, chris, AndreyT, Kate Gregory, lpapp Dec 3 '13 at 20:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Take a look at the error message Clang gives. –  chris Dec 3 '13 at 18:47
    
y.print() is not working?? –  Santosh Sahu Dec 3 '13 at 18:49
2  
You declared y as a function taking no parameters and returning a CPPDemo::Fraction. Search for "most vexing parse" on SO. –  jrok Dec 3 '13 at 18:53

3 Answers 3

Change the test file to:

int main()
  {
  CPPDemo::Fraction y;
  y.print();  //flagged as compiler error**
  }

Without the () the compiler does not see y.prints as a function call. My knowledge of C++ syntax rules is not good enough to give a better explanation. sorry.

share|improve this answer
    
my bad...I accidently edited out the ()...didn't mean to do that. I expected the default constructor to be called. Filling in a value (i.e. print(1,2) works). I expected the default value to be printed. Any ideas? –  user3062695 Dec 8 '13 at 2:09

change

CPPDemo::Fraction y();
**y.print;

to

CPPDemo::Fraction y;
y.print();

Because the first declares a function, it does not declare the object you wanted. And the print function needs brackets (I don't know what the ** were for)

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I accidently left off the (). I updated the error report. It appears that the default constructor is not accessed. –  user3062695 Dec 8 '13 at 2:05

You forgot the function braces ().

Try

y.print()

Oh damn, that got me again. You also need to fix the instanciation

CPPDemo::Fraction y;
share|improve this answer
    
yes!, I accidently edited them out. I expected the default constructor to be called. It works with y.print(1,2) but not y.print(). Any ideas? thanks –  user3062695 Dec 8 '13 at 2:10

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