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Why is the following code giving segmentation fault?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    FILE *file;
    file = fopen("text","r");
    if (file == NULL) printf("Error READING FILE");
    if (ferror(file)) printf("error reading file");    //line 9
    return 0;
}

Doing backtrace in gdb gives:-

> #0  0x00007ffff7ad9d30 in ferror () from /lib/libc.so.6
> #1  0x00000000004005fa in main () at test.c:9
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why are you continuing execution after you find that file is NULL? –  Naveen Jan 10 '10 at 6:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If fopen returns NULL, then the file isn't open; you're passing NULL in to ferror, which is invalid. You don't have an open file to pass in; that's what NULL means, that it couldn't give you a file pointer. ferror is for getting errors related to reading and writing the file, once it has actually been opened and you have the file to work with.

If fopen fails, and you want to get more information about why, you need to check the errno global variable, defined in errno.h.

#include <errno.h>

// ...snip...

if (file == NULL) 
  printf("Error READING FILE: %s\n", strerror(errno));

This example shows how to fetch a string describing the error; you could also compare the value in errno against one of the possible values it could have, and do something different depending on what the error is. See the fopen man page, or the POSIX spec, for a list of possible errors to compare against. Here's how you could check against various possible errors:

if (file == NULL) {
  int error = errno;  // copy it so other calls like printf don't modify it
  printf("Error READING FILE: %s\n", strerror(error));
  switch (error) {
  case EACCESS:
    // access was denied
    break;
  case ENOENT:
    // the file or one of its ancestors doesn't exist
    break;
    // etc...
  }
}

(this is an expansion of something I originally wrote in a comment on another answer)

share|improve this answer
    
+1, nice answer. Note that the C standard doesn't require fopen to set errno (POSIX does). You should set errno to 0 before calling fopen(), "just in case". Also, errno may or may not be a global variable: it is a modifiable lvalue, which may result from a function call if the library implements it like that. –  Alok Singhal Jan 10 '10 at 19:06
    
Thanks for the clarification, Alok. I thought of mentioning that errno is not actually a global, but I think that would be more confusing than enlightening. I was not aware that C doesn't require fopen to set errno; most C code I write is on Linux, Mac OS X, or the BSDs, so I tend to pay more attention to the man pages, and POSIX, than the C standard. It's good to know that that assumption isn't necessarily portable. –  Brian Campbell Jan 10 '10 at 20:30
    
Yeah - I see it as a quality of implementation issue too - so it would be hard to find a good library that doesn't set errno, particularly because POSIX requires it. –  Alok Singhal Jan 11 '10 at 5:30

file is NULL. You're not seeing the first printf because the program crashes before stdout is flushed.

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2  
+1 referencing i/o buffer flushing. –  pilcrow Jan 10 '10 at 6:20
    
When is the stdout flushed actually? I mean normally.. –  shadyabhi Jan 10 '10 at 6:40
    
If i add:- fflush(stdout) before line 9, i get the output. But, just for information I want to know, when is stdout flushed in programs? –  shadyabhi Jan 10 '10 at 6:42
2  
When you print a newline character*, or when the buffer is full, or when the program ends. (*): By default, stdout is line-buffered on most systems. You should also print error messages on stderr: usually it's unbuffered (but more importantly, error messages should go to stderr, not stdout). –  Alok Singhal Jan 10 '10 at 6:54
    
@Alok Thanx for the reply.. Exactly what I asked. –  shadyabhi Jan 10 '10 at 7:28

If file is equal to NULL on line 9, then the Seg Fault will occur during the ferror() call.

If there the file is NULL (as determined on line 8), then you shouldn't perform line 9.

Your line 8 code should be changed as such:

if (file == NULL)
{
    printf("Error READING FILE");
    return 1;
}

NB: i could be very wrong about this, it's been a while since i've done C/C++

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Or change line 9 to else if .... –  KennyTM Jan 10 '10 at 6:29
    
also another possibility –  Alastair Pitts Jan 10 '10 at 6:38
    
I thought ferror() can be used for checking if the file could be opened successfully. But, its used after the file is opened and checking further error, if any.. Am i right? –  shadyabhi Jan 10 '10 at 6:38
    
ferror() checks the stream to see if the error indicator (on the stream) has been set. Passing a NULL stream will produce the seg fault. cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/ferror –  Alastair Pitts Jan 10 '10 at 6:53
    
Shadyabhi: If fopen returns NULL, then the file isn't open; you're passing NULL in to ferror, which is invalid. You don't have an open file to pass in; that's what NULL means, that it couldn't give you a file pointer. ferror is for getting errors related to reading and writing the file, once it has actually been opened and you have the file to work with. –  Brian Campbell Jan 10 '10 at 6:54

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