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I'm not sure if this is possible within the language or not, but imagine this:

class Parent(object):
    def __init__(self, number):
        self.variable_to_access = "I want this"
        self.object_list = []
        for i in range(number): self.object_list.append(Object_In_List(i))

class Object_In_List(object):
    def __init__(self): pass

    def my_method(self):
        # How can I access variable_to_access

I have over simplified this but I was thinking Object_In_List could inherit Parent but Parent will contain many other items and I am concerned about memory usage.

I want to avoid passing the variable_to_access itself constantly. Is this actually possible to access variable_to_access within my_method()?

Thanks

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1  
You need to pass the value to the object, or, make it global. –  Simeon Visser Dec 3 '13 at 22:54
    
"I am concerned about memory usage". Don't do premature optimization. Class and instance dicts can share keys, this can reduce significantly the amount of memory required. Besides, if memory was really a problem you'd have to avoid using classes altogether and use plain tuples instead. –  Bakuriu Dec 4 '13 at 19:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is a slightly more complicated example which behaves like Java inner classes

class Parent(object):
    def __init__(self, number):
        self.variable_to_access = "I want this"
        self.object_list = [] for i in range(number): 
            # Pass in a reference to the parent class when constructing our "inner class"
            self.object_list.append(Object_In_List(self, i))

class Object_In_List(object):
    # We need a reference to our parent class
    def __init__(self, parent, i):
        self.parent = parent

    # ... So we can forward attribute lookups on to the parent
    def __getattr__(self, name):
        return getattr(self.parent, name)

    # Now we can treat members of the parent class as if they were our own members (just like Java inner classes)
    def my_method(self):
        # You probably want to do something other than print here
        print(self.variable_to_access)
share|improve this answer
class Parent(object):
    def __init__(self, number):
        self.variable_to_access = "I want this"
        self.object_list = []
        for i in range(number):
            self.object_list.append(Object_In_List(self.variable_to_access, i))

class Object_In_List(object):
    def __init__(self, parent_var, i):
        self.pv = parent_var

    def my_method(self):
        # How can I access variable_to_access
        # self.pv is what you want
share|improve this answer

Right now it seems the only place that any Object_In_List objects exists are within the Parent attribute self.object_list. If that is the case then you are in the Parent class when accessing the Object_In_List already, so you don't even need my_method in Object_In_List. If these objects exist outside of that list then you would have to pass the Parent object or variable anyway, as shown in the other answers.

If you want to be creative you could play with class attributes of Parent. This would not be as "variable" though, unless your class attribute was a dictionary, but then there is the memory thing.

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