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What would be a good alternative pattern to this...?

NOTE: I'm keen to avoid downcasting the objects every time I want to access the sub-class' methods, ie the ((Bicycle)vehicles[1]).getSaddles() bit. The sub-classes of Vehicle are only going to be simple with a constructor that takes in values and some getters, but the getters are not the same.

public class Main {

    Vehicle[] vehicles;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Main();
    }

    private Main() {

        DataStuff data = new DataStuff();

        vehicles = new Vehicle[data.getNext()];

        int i=0;
        while(i<vehicles.length) {
            int type = data.getNext();
            if (type == 1) {
                vehicles[i] = new Car(VehicleType.car, data);
            } else if (type == 2) {
                vehicles[i] = new Bicycle(VehicleType.bicycle, data);
            }
            i++;
        }

        if (vehicles[1].type.equals(VehicleType.bicycle)) {
            System.out.println(vehicles[1].type.toString() + ", number of saddles:" + ((Bicycle)vehicles[1]).getSaddles());
        }

    }

    public class DataStuff {

        private int[] data = new int[] {2, 1, 4, 5, 1, 4, 2, 2, 1, 1};
        private int pointer = 0;

        public int getNext() {
            return data[pointer++];
        }
    }

}

...

public class Vehicle {

    public VehicleType type;

    public Vehicle(VehicleType type) {
        this.type = type;
    }

}

...

public enum VehicleType {
    car,
    bicycle 
}

...

public class Bicycle extends Vehicle {

    private int wheels;
    private int bells;
    private int saddles;

    public Bicycle(VehicleType type, DataStuff data) {
        super(type);
        wheels = data.getNext();
        bells = data.getNext();
        saddles = data.getNext();
    }

    public int getWheels() {
        return wheels;
    }

    public int getBells() {
        return bells;
    }

    public int getSaddles() {
        return saddles;
    }

}

...

public class Car extends Vehicle {

    private int wheels;
    private int seats;
    private int engines;
    private int doors;

    public Car(VehicleType type, DataStuff data) {
        super(type);
        wheels = data.getNext();
        seats = data.getNext();
        engines = data.getNext();
        doors = data.getNext();
    }

    public int getWheels() {
        return wheels;
    }

    public int getSeats() {
        return seats;
    }

    public int getEngines() {
        return engines;
    }

    public int getDoors() {
        return doors;
    }

}

UPDATE 1

Assume that the objects ObjectA and ObjectB are completely different(ish) but I must store them in a generic way. ObjectA could be a definition of a country, ObjectB could be a tree...

UPDATE 2

(I also updated my psuedo code above to fix an error and make it more obvious) I was hoping not to write too much code as I don't want people getting bogged down with the specifics of my test case, but the code above is close to what I need to achieve.

My question was perhaps poorly worded. I'll try to be less vague.

So... I have data being read in regarding arbitrary objects in a random order that DO share properties (my code above doesn't reflect this though). I need to be able to iterate through the objects after parsing the int[] and get the specific data for each too... I want to avoid, however, all the downcasting that I would have to do (example in the println statement).

What is a good alternative pattern to be using? Or is this going to be ok? I don't have to have huge if else blocks as the data in the int[] (don't worry about the DataStuff class that is just a simple example) will all be generated based on a query (also not shown in the above code) that will be provided by the implementation, so the dev will know what he is expecting back (by developer I mean me anyway lol...).

I hope that this is enough info to describe what I'm trying to achieve.

share|improve this question
    
Polymorphism?.. –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 3 '13 at 23:07
    
I don't get it, what is it you're trying to do? A baseclass' methods are also available from a subclass.. new ObjectA(ObjectType.objectA this looks like a builder, but probably isn't.. –  Jeroen Vannevel Dec 3 '13 at 23:07
    
If ObjectA is a country, and ObjectB is a tree, why are they both extending the same base class? What are you modelling?? –  Amir Afghani Dec 3 '13 at 23:24
    
I updated my question with a less vague (and working) example. –  Neilos Dec 4 '13 at 1:40
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Without knowing your object model or what work it is you're objects are doing, I would recommend that you simply add an abstract method on your base class and override that method to do the appropriate thing. This is basic polymorphic behavior.

abstract class ChessPiece { 
    abstract void move(Board board);
}

class Knight extends ChessPiece { 
    @Override 
    public void move(Board board) { 
    //...weeee, I'm a Knight
    }
}

class Bishop extends ChessPiece { 
    @Override 
    public void move(Board board) { 
    //...weeee, I'm a Bishop
    }
}

If you find yourself casting and using instanceof, it's generally an indicator that you're doing it wrong.

UPDATE:

Printing just the saddle details in this scenario may require a downcast, but why wouldn't you just have an overridden toString method on each Vehicle and print out the Bicycle object?

    if (vehicles[1].type.equals(VehicleType.bicycle)) {
        System.out.println(vehicles[1]);
    }

   public class Bicycle extends Vehicle { 

       @Override
       public String toString() { 
          return this.saddles;
       }
   }

If this doesn't suffice, I suppose you could write a static method on Bicycle that takes a Bicycle and prints out it's saddle information, and simply invoke the method in your print statement like this:

System.out.println(vehicles[1].type.toString() + ", number of saddles:" + Bicycle.getSaddleInfo(Bicycle.class.cast(vehicles[1])));
share|improve this answer
    
I cannot define every method in the ChessPiece class they don't necessarily share methods across the subclasses, some might, others not, one might have a method that only it uses. But I need access to each of the sub-class' methods. –  Neilos Dec 3 '13 at 23:17
1  
Can you describe your concrete example in more detail? –  Amir Afghani Dec 3 '13 at 23:20
    
See my question, thanks. –  Neilos Dec 4 '13 at 1:42
    
Thanks for your suggestions. Having an overridden toString method could work but I don't just want to be writing the data. I need to perform operations on it etc, and I don't want to have to have another layer that takes the string to extract the data and then store it somehow and etc... The 2nd example is not much neater than the downcasting, in fact it still requires a cast, but it is a good idea. My real question I suppose was, is downcasting evil? But I think from the comments I have received it is not necessarily a bad way to approach this problem (considering the limited alternatives). –  Neilos Dec 4 '13 at 13:05
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Considering your "country or tree" comment, I think you are experiencing something called "Object-relational impedance mismatch". The problem is the nature of static typing and polymorphism imposes a hierarchical rigidity that the real world doesn't always (or often) obey. There are alternatives to statically typed systems to organize these properties. You could add a Map<String, Object> filed to store arbitrary fields (this is how many libraries map Java to more dynamic information systems like NoSQL or Graph databases).

You can also just accept the down casting, it's not as onerous as you might think, considering the fact that the JVM (which reads compiled Byte code) is a dynamic environment.

In your original example (assuming BaseObject was an interface) you could add (well technically override) a toString() implementation to each class (removing the need to check the type)

share|improve this answer
    
it is not the checking of the type that is the issue, I updated my question for a more rigorous example, please see. –  Neilos Dec 4 '13 at 1:41
    
I tried to address your edits, but the gist is there aren't many alternatives in Java, although if you take a look at Clojure or Groovy you might appreciate how other languages have solved this problem. –  Jason Sperske Dec 4 '13 at 2:41
    
Hmmm ok, I might have a look at those then, thanks. –  Neilos Dec 4 '13 at 12:47
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