Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any way to implement, just once, a function in a base class that will return an instance of whatever derived class it is called from?

share|improve this question
    
CRTP. –  0x499602D2 Dec 3 '13 at 23:18
    
CRTP is the ticket! –  UltraBird Dec 4 '13 at 0:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
template <class TDerived> class Base
{
    TDerived retInstance()
    {
        return TDerived();
    }
};

class Derived : Base<Derived>
{
    //class definition here
};
share|improve this answer

You can do something similar to the following C++ code example if your language of choice supports covariant return types:

struct A {
    virtual A *make() = 0;
};

struct B : public A {
    B *make() override {
        return new B{};  
    }
};

While this doesn't fit your criteria of defined once in the base class, I think it is worth mentioning.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't initially see the c++ tag so you can ignore the covariant return type comment. –  jshrake Dec 3 '13 at 23:33

Like mentioned,

  1. CRTP (Curiously Recurring Template Pattern)

  2. Or Cloneable Pattern.


1. CRTP

See it Liv on Coliru

template <typename Derived>
struct BaseImpl
{
    // normal stuff
    int foo() const { return 42; }

    // CRTP stuff
    Derived make_new() const 
    {
        return Derived("test 123");
    }
};

#include <string>

struct MyStruct : BaseImpl<MyStruct>
{
    std::string value;
    MyStruct(std::string const& value) : value(value) {}
};

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    MyStruct a("first");
    MyStruct b = a.make_new();

    std::cout << a.value << "\n"
              << b.value << "\n";
}

Prints

first
test 123

2. Cloneable pattern:

See it Live on Coliru too

struct ICloneable
{
    virtual const char* whoami() const = 0;
    virtual ICloneable* clone() const = 0;

    virtual ~ICloneable() throw() {}
};

#include <string>

struct A : ICloneable
{
    virtual const char* whoami() const { return "struct A"; }
    virtual ICloneable* clone() const { return new A; }
};

struct B : ICloneable
{
    virtual const char* whoami() const { return "struct B"; }
    virtual ICloneable* clone() const { return new B; }
};

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

int main()
{
    A a;
    B b;

    ICloneable* aclone = a.clone();
    ICloneable* bclone = b.clone();

    std::cout << typeid(*aclone).name() << "\n";
    std::cout << typeid(*bclone).name() << "\n";

    delete aclone;
    delete bclone;
}

Prints (compiler dependent):

1A
1B
share|improve this answer
    
Your clone example would be more relevant to the question if you get rid of the IClonable interface, make B derive from A, and have A declare a virtual clone() method that B overrides. –  Remy Lebeau Dec 3 '13 at 23:56
    
@RemyLebeau I choose to present the typical pattern. Also, I don't see how it would be more relevant. Simply remove B, rename { IConable -> A } and { A -> B } and you arrive at your sample. If you don't want pure virtuals, implement it :) –  sehe Dec 3 '13 at 23:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.