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I am trying to simultaneously encrypt a message to multiple public keys using ECC in python. The modules I have tried include a number of seccure-based modules, along with https://pypi.python.org/pypi/ecc

Can anyone help me with this? To be clear, I am trying to avoid encrypting a separate ciphertext for each public key, which is a linear expansion factor; ECC can achieve far better.

(sks-ecc is the only implementation I've seen to succeed at this at all, and there doesn't seem to be availability in python.)

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I think you should rephrase the question to be something more along the lines of "I am trying to simultaneously encrypt a message to multiple public keys using ECC in python. The libraries I have tried include a number of seccure-based libraries, and also (list)". That emphasizes the problem you are trying to solve. Maybe even tell us why it has to be in python, or on a linux based system. I think that would avoid some of the "off topic" close vote issues. –  Gustav Bertram Dec 4 '13 at 13:00
    
Create random symmetric key. Encrypt message with that key with symmetric authenticated encryption. Encrypt that key to multiple public keys with standard ECC APIs. –  CodesInChaos Dec 4 '13 at 13:57
    
Thanks for the suggestion, Gustav, I'll do that. And no, CodesInChaos, I know how KEMs/keywraps work. I want to make KEMs. The "standard ECC APIs" in Python will not allow me to "encrypt that key to multiple public keys" the way that ECC is designed to do; the only way I can do it right now involves linear size expansion, which is unacceptable for my purposes. –  codetaku Dec 4 '13 at 16:48

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It seems like, under the assumption that I'm even correct that this property of ECC is possible, which the open-source corner of the internet seems to be trying to convince me is false even though I've worked with it myself, it's probably patented, so I'm giving up and just doing the linear expansion.

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