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i am using this query

SELECT * FROM parent_table
LEFT JOIN child_tab ON parent_table.id = child_tab.parent_id
LEFT JOIN child_tab2 ON parent_table.id =  child_tab2.parent_id 

if i add this condition like :

WHERE child_tab2.parent_id IS NOT NULL
OR child_tab.parent_id IS NOT NULL;

After that orphan rows will removed. It's fine if join condition over two three tables but i don't want such type implement in WHERE clause since my join condition are dynamic and no of child tables are variable.(it may be 1 to 20 max)

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Afaik there you need something in the where clause. What exactly is the problem with using a where clause? Would a single condition that covers all tables be OK? –  Bohemian Dec 4 '13 at 8:00
    
Could you please create a fiddle with an example? –  Oscar Pérez Dec 4 '13 at 8:22
    
Why would a variable number of child tables be a problem? –  CL. Dec 4 '13 at 8:48
    
Is this sqlite or mysql? –  LS_dev Dec 4 '13 at 9:05
    
Even shorter would be this WHERE COALESCE(child_tab.parent_id, child_tab2.parent_id) IS NOT NULL. Note, COALESCE expects at least 2 arguments. –  Wernfried Dec 4 '13 at 9:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If your joins are variable and dynamic, you have no choice other than to filter in the WHERE clause. If it feels any more elegant, though, you could avoid the repeated OR OR OR with this, which could simplify the where clause's logical expression:

WHERE COALESCE(child_tab.parent_id, child_tab2.parent_id) IS NOT NULL

COALESCE() accepts a list of however many arguments -- not just two -- and returns the value of the leftmost not-null argument, or null if they are all null.

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/comparison-operators.html#function_coalesce

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Thank you very much!!! its working fine. –  Sandy Dec 4 '13 at 10:13

I created a fiddle with this problem: SQLFiddle.

Basically, you need left and right joins together with a UNION:

SELECT * 
  FROM parent_table
  JOIN (
         SELECT  
                child_tab.parent_id as cparent_id, 
                child_tab2.parent_id as c2parent_id
           FROM child_tab 
      LEFT JOIN child_tab2
                   ON child_tab.parent_id =  child_tab2.parent_id 
     UNION
         SELECT 
                child_tab2.parent_id as cparent_id, 
                child_tab.parent_id as c2parent_id
           FROM child_tab 
      RIGHT JOIN child_tab2
                   ON child_tab.parent_id =  child_tab2.parent_id 
       ) AS s1
    ON parent_table.id = s1.cparent_id
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its not necessary all child tables have data related to parent table e.g. one table has four record with parent id "5" and another table don't have any record with parent id "5' in case of inner join it will return none and in case of left join it will return data related to parent id 5 for table one and another table rows will come blank along with same parent id "5" –  Sandy Dec 4 '13 at 7:56
    
Ok, I'm edditing it –  Oscar Pérez Dec 4 '13 at 7:59
    
mmmm.... You'r right... It's not as easy as I though... Interesting! –  Oscar Pérez Dec 4 '13 at 8:03

Your WHERE is pointless, as LEFT JOIN will ignore all unmatched (and NULL) child tables ids.

You may use following:

SELECT * FROM parent_table
JOIN child_tab ON parent_table.id = child_tab.parent_id
LEFT JOIN child_tab2 ON parent_table.id =  child_tab2.parent_id
UNION
SELECT * FROM parent_table
LEFT JOIN child_tab ON parent_table.id = child_tab.parent_id
JOIN child_tab2 ON parent_table.id =  child_tab2.parent_id;

but I can't see any advantage over using a WHERE clause like following:

SELECT *
FROM parent_table
     JOIN child_tab ON parent_table.id = child_tab.parent_id
LEFT JOIN child_tab2 ON parent_table.id =  child_tab2.parent_id
UNION
SELECT *
FROM parent_table
LEFT JOIN child_tab ON parent_table.id = child_tab.parent_id
     JOIN child_tab2 ON parent_table.id =  child_tab2.parent_id;

» SQL Fiddle sample

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1  
INNER JOIN is equivalent to WHERE a IS NOT NOT AND b IS NOT NULL, OP wants an OR in that condition. –  OGHaza Dec 4 '13 at 9:06
    
@OGHaza You're right! Corrected. –  LS_dev Dec 4 '13 at 9:25

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