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I'm trying to create .remmina profile files for each one of my servers according to my /etc/hosts, i wrote the next script, but my problem is that in the result of the sed command, where i expected to see the value of the $hostname variable instead i see the word $hostname , how can it be done correctly?

#!/bin/bash
num=100
for srv in `cat ~/srv.lst`;
  do cp 1.remmina $num.remmina
  hostname=grep $srv /etc/hosts | awk -F" " '{print $2}'
  sed -i 's/name=amavm4/name=$hostname/g' ~/.remmina/$num.remmina
  sed -i 's/server=amavm4:5906/server=$hostname:5906/g' ~/.remmina/$num.remmina
  num=$((num+1))
done

So after your answers, i've edited the script to look like that:

#!/bin/bash
num=1392344753668
for srv in `cat ~/srv.lst`;
    do cp 1.remmina $num.remmina
    hostname=`grep $srv /etc/hosts | awk -F" " '{print $2}'`
    sed -i 's/name=amadw1/name='$hostname'/g' ~/.remmina/$num.remmina
    sed -i 's/server=amadw1:5906/server='$hostname':5906/g' ~/.remmina/$num.remmina
    num=$((num+1))
done

But then when i run it i get the following errors:

itaig@itaig-lt:~/.remmina$ ./rem_add_srv 
sed: -e expression #1, char 26: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 35: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 26: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 35: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 31: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 40: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 25: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 34: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 22: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 31: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 26: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 35: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 26: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 35: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 26: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 35: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 28: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 37: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 24: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 33: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 26: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 35: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 25: unterminated `s' command
sed: -e expression #1, char 34: unterminated `s' command
itaig@itaig-lt:~/.remmina$

It seems like i get only 20 errors while the script creates up to 87 files, why do i get this error?

share|improve this question
    
This is a FAQ. Use double quotes. –  devnull Dec 4 '13 at 9:11
    
Besides using double quotes, you can also do it this way sed -i 's/name=amavm4/name='$hostname'/g' –  ray Dec 4 '13 at 9:16
    
Simply replace single quotes with double quotes in the sed commands in your original code (the one that you started with). –  devnull Dec 4 '13 at 9:26
    
it still gives me these errors –  Itai Ganot Dec 4 '13 at 9:29
1  
echo $hostname before sed, maybe grep $srv /etc/hosts | awk -F" " '{print $2}' returns you more than one rows –  ray Dec 4 '13 at 9:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need to ensure two things:

  1. The shell variable needs to be evaluated by the shell; therefore it must be enclosed in double quotes, not in single quotes. Also, using it outside of quotes (your current version) is discouraged because then characters in the value are evaluated by the shell and things like spaces become token-delimiter etc. So you should use this version:

    sed -i "s/name=amadw1/name=$hostname/g" ~/.remmina/"$num".remmina

  2. The value of the variable must not contain a newline, because sed can only handle single-line values in its s command. I assume that your grep command produces more than one line, the awk changes each of them, so the result is still multi-line. To avoid this, consider which of the multiple lines is the one you want to use. Maybe the first? Then just use head -1:

    hostname=grep $srv /etc/hosts | head -1 | awk -F" " '{print $2}'

share|improve this answer
    
itaig@itaig-lt:~$ hostname=grep 192.168.57.230 /etc/hosts | awk -F" " '{print $2}' itaig@itaig-lt:~$ echo $hostname Itai-test --- the output is the hostname, it's a one line one word output –  Itai Ganot Dec 4 '13 at 13:53
#!/bin/bash
num=1392344753668
cat ~/srv.lst | while read srv
 do 
   cp 1.remmina ${num}.remmina
   sed -n "/${srv}/ s/^[^[:blank:]]\{1,\}[[:blank:]]\{1,\}\([^[:blank:]]\{1,\}\).*/\1/p;s/$/ void/" /etc/hosts | read hostname Ignore
   if [ -n "${Ignore}" ]
    then
      sed -i "s/name=amadw1/name=${hostname}/g" ~/.remmina/$num.remmina
      sed -i "s/server=amadw1:5906/server=${hostname}:5906/g" ~/.remmina/$num.remmina
      let num+=1
    else
      echo "Bad hostname for srv: ${srv}" >&2
    fi
 done

work in KSH, think it's also ok in bash. just insure that hostname does not contain "&" "\1" -> "\9" (normaly not)

share|improve this answer
1  
The read will have no effect; variables read in pipes are only valid in that pipe, not outside. Instead of x | read y you could use read y < <(x), though, then it might work. –  Alfe Dec 4 '13 at 14:06
    
sorry didn't know that in bash this behavior is different from ksh, thanks for the info –  NeronLeVelu Dec 4 '13 at 15:03

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