Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

A trivial question but I cant find the answer as of yet.

I want to split the dataframe column 'year' into a set of new columns with each year the column name and subsequent data below it:

    Year     FQ
   1975  3.156
   1975  8.980
   1977 10.304
   1977  7.861
   1979  4.729
   1979  7.216
   1981  4.856
   1981  3.438
   1983  9.887
   1983  3.850

desired output:

1975    1977    1979   1981    1983 

3.156   10.304  4.729  4.856   9.887
8.980   7.861   7.216  3.438   3.850

sample data:

d<-structure(list(Year = structure(1:10, .Label = c("1975", "1975", 
"1977", "1977", "1979", "1979", "1981", "1981", "1983", "1983", 
"1985", "1985", "1987", "1987", "1988", "1988", "1991", "1991", 
"1993", "1993", "1995", "1995", "1997", "1997", "2000", "2000", 
"2001", "2001", "2003", "2003", "2005", "2005", "2007", "2007", 
"2009", "2009", "2011", "2011"), class = "factor"), FQ = c(3.156, 
8.98, 10.304, 7.861, 4.729, 7.216, 4.856, 3.438, 9.887, 3.85)), .Names = c("Year", 
"FQ"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(1L, 62L, 123L, 184L, 
245L, 306L, 367L, 428L, 489L, 550L))

I have tried melting the data:

melt(d, id.vars = "Year")

and then using cast:

cast(d, Year~value) 

and reshape

d1<-reshape(d, idvar="Year", timevar="FQ", direction="wide")

but to no avail

share|improve this question
    
Is it always 2 lines per Year? – zx8754 Dec 4 '13 at 11:34
    
no, I have just used this for an example. It varies depending on what analysis is being done. so it maybe 365 lines in one analysis then 61 lines in another – Salmo salar Dec 4 '13 at 11:36
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You don't really have an "ID" variable, so you need to create one. It will be easier if Year was a character variable, so I've done that transformation below, in addition to adding an "ID" variable:

d <- within(d, {
  Year <- as.character(Year)
  ID <- ave(Year, Year, FUN=seq_along)
})

From here, it is easy to use dcast directly...

library(reshape2)
dcast(d, ID ~ Year, value.var="FQ")
#   ID  1975   1977  1979  1981  1983
# 1  1 3.156 10.304 4.729 4.856 9.887
# 2  2 8.980  7.861 7.216 3.438 3.850

... or reshape.

reshape(d, direction  = "wide", idvar="ID", timevar="Year")
#    ID FQ.1975 FQ.1977 FQ.1979 FQ.1981 FQ.1983
# 1   1   3.156  10.304   4.729   4.856   9.887
# 62  2   8.980   7.861   7.216   3.438   3.850
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent. nice and simple! However I would of thought a function somewhere would have been able to do this straight off, it seems not. thanks again! – Salmo salar Dec 4 '13 at 11:43
1  
@Salmosalar, I would say that both of these functions handle the data "straight off". The point is that for a given row/column combination, both of these functions look for a unique value, which is not present in your "Year" variable, so we had to create one. Hope it makes sense! – Ananda Mahto Dec 4 '13 at 11:47
    
Yes, thats where I was getting stuck! – Salmo salar Dec 4 '13 at 11:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.