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I have an UI with 2 buttons - "Start" and "Stop". When I hit Start button I need to spawn a task which does something in the background.When I hit "Stop" then if there is any tasks actively running tasks then I need to cancel them. Now if I click on Start again without stopping, then any active tasks should be stopped and a new one should be spawned.Also any cancellations should be logged as well.

I have a small class which does this Starting and Stopping of tasks using TPL(I'm a beginner), but I'm not very sure whether this is the right approach to do this, in terms of the constructs used. Question is - is there a better way(lesser code, framework api's) to accomplish this using TPL. Please note that I'm using .NET 4.0 and async is not availiable to me.

Code:

public class Runner
    {
        private readonly List<CancellationTokenSource> _activeTokenSource = new List<CancellationTokenSource>();
        private readonly List<Task> _activeTasks = new List<Task>();

        public void Start()
        {
            StopAnyActiveTasks();
            var activeTokenSource = new CancellationTokenSource();
            var activeCancellationToken = activeTokenSource.Token;
            var task = new Task<ValueObject>(x =>
            {
                activeCancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();                
                Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10));
                activeCancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
                return new ValueObject();
            }, activeCancellationToken);
            task.ContinueWith(ant =>
            {
                try
                {
                    var result = ant.Result;
                }
                catch (AggregateException e)
                {
                    e.InnerExceptions.ToList()
                        .ForEach(x => System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Exception" + x.Message));
                }
            }, TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);
            task.ContinueWith(ant =>
            {
                try
                {
                    var result = ant.Result;
                }
                catch (AggregateException e)
                {
                    e.InnerExceptions.ToList()
                        .ForEach(x => System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Aggregate Exception on cancellation" + x.Message));
                }
            }, TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted);

            _activeTasks.Add(task);
            _activeTokenSource.Add(activeTokenSource);
            task.Start();
        }

        public void StopAnyActiveTasks()
        {
            if (_activeTasks.Count <= 0)
                return;

            foreach (var cancellationTokenSource in _activeTokenSource)
            {
                if (!cancellationTokenSource.IsCancellationRequested)
                    cancellationTokenSource.Cancel();
            }

        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
That looks like the standard approach (I think). Basically the cancellation token is the mechanism to drive this. async await is available on .NET 4 as it's actually a compiler concern: stackoverflow.com/questions/9110472/using-async-await-on-net-4 –  Adam Houldsworth Dec 4 '13 at 13:47
    
How do you remove items from the two lists? And why are they even lists, when you said that starting a Task cancels the previous one? –  svick Dec 4 '13 at 14:22
    
You only need one CancellationTokenSource - just share it's token with all the Tasks –  Schneider Dec 5 '13 at 12:47
    
Also your ContinueWiths seem to serve no purpose. How do you intend to use Result? It's OK to just use try catch when you access the result. –  Schneider Dec 5 '13 at 12:52

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