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I have 3 different web applications (WARs).

Now some classes \ beans \ services are shared betweeen them,

1) Is it a good practice to share beans \ services \ entities \ repositories (with crud operations) in a different jar? Or Every shared project should contain only pojos?

2) If i do share a jar, With some autowiring and spring beans , which spring container runs it? the container of its root project? or it has its own container?

3) Any reference to shade some light on this issue will help

Thanks.

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2 Answers

1) Yes, this is a good practice. Combine common code in a separate jar and depend on it in every project that represents your web applications.

2) You can't share a WAR over different modules, only JARs...

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So can my JAR contain repositories? if so when i try to use repository.create() does it uses the transaction manager of the primary project? –  Urbanleg Dec 4 '13 at 13:06
    
I don't see how a JAR can contain repositories? Your JAR contains the common code shared by your different web applications (WARs). A WAR file is just a special kind of JAR packaging java classes with additional functionality for the web. So if you depend on the JAR file containing the code you don't want to duplicate, you can use it in all your web application projects. The result of depending on a jar or putting the code as java classes in your project is the same. –  Mathias Ghys Dec 4 '13 at 13:13
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It is a rather unclear how you are proposing to share the code.

One way to share code is to build the shared code / project as a JAR, and then include it in the WEB-INF/lib directory of each of the WAR files that need it. There are no inherent problems with this. The classloader for each webapp will load its own copy of the class, and each one will have its own statics, and the webapps won't interfere with each other. This is the "normal" way.

Another way is to put the JAR into the web-container's shared library directory. This has problems:

  • You have potential problems with deployment / redeployment:

    • A JAR in the shared lib can only be redeployed by restarting the container.

    • You (typically) can't redeploy using the web container's management pages / interface.

    • You have one more thing to remember to redeploy.

    • What if different webapps require different versions of the JAR??

  • You have potential leakage problems via statics of the shared classes.

    • Information can leak from one webapp to another.

    • Types can leak ... leading to "inexplicable" class-cast failures.

    • You could exacerbate the "permgen leak" issue with hot redeploys.

The only upside of putting the shared JAR in the shared library directory is that you potentially reduce the code footprint by having only one copy of the shared library in memory. But usually the saving is simply not worth the hassle.


1) Is it a good practice to share beans \ services \ entities \ repositories (with crud operations) in a different jar? Or Every shared project should contain only pojos?

I see no problems with any of those ... provided that you are sharing via the JAR-in-a-WAR approach.

2) If i do share a jar, With some autowiring and spring beans , which spring container runs it? the container of its root project? or it has its own container?

Beans from a JAR-in-a-WAR are managed by the WAR webapp's Spring container. I'm not sure about the other approach ... but I suspect it is the same. (I wouldn't expect the Spring wiring mechanisms to care whether bean classes come from the webapp's classloader or from the classloader for the "library" directory.)

3) Any reference to shade some light on this issue will help.

Nothing specific. But the organization of the classloaders should be described in your web container's documentation set.

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Why should i bother with the latter? –  Urbanleg Dec 4 '13 at 13:08
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