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Suppose I have a data frame with 6 columns, and I want to set col 1:3 to the values in col 4:6 (this comes up a lot when merging). With data frames it's easy:

set.seed(1)
df <- data.frame(matrix(sample(1:100,30),ncol=6))
df
#   X1 X2 X3 X4 X5 X6
# 1 27 86 19 43 75 29
# 2 37 97 16 88 17  1
# 3 57 62 61 83 51 28
# 4 89 58 34 32 10 81
# 5 20  6 67 63 21 25

df[,1:3] <- df[,4:6]                    # very, very straightforward...
df
#   X1 X2 X3 X4 X5 X6
# 1 43 75 29 43 75 29
# 2 88 17  1 88 17  1
# 3 83 51 28 83 51 28
# 4 32 10 81 32 10 81
# 5 63 21 25 63 21 25

With data.tables, not so much:

library(data.table)
dt <- data.table(df)
dt[,1:3,with=F] <- dt[,4:6,with=F]
## Error in `[<-.data.table`(`*tmp*`, , 1:3, with = F, value = list(X4 = c(43L,  : unused argument (with = F)

This works, but seems extremely complicated for such a simple transformation:

dt[, names(dt)[1:3]:=dt[,4:6,with=F]]   # very, very complicated...
dt
#    X1 X2 X3 X4 X5 X6
# 1: 43 75 29 43 75 29
# 2: 88 17  1 88 17  1
# 3: 83 51 28 83 51 28
# 4: 32 10 81 32 10 81
# 5: 63 21 25 63 21 25

The question is: is there a simpler way to assign one set of columns in a data table to the values from another set of columns in the same data table?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can use the := operator and a with=FALSE in each data.table:

dt[, 1:3 := dt[, 4:6, with=FALSE], with=FALSE]

> dt
   X1 X2 X3 X4 X5 X6
1: 43 75 29 43 75 29
2: 88 17  1 88 17  1
3: 83 51 28 83 51 28
4: 32 10 81 32 10 81
5: 63 21 25 63 21 25
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1  
+1 missing a closing bracket? –  Matthew Plourde Dec 4 '13 at 18:43
    
this is essentially same as OP already has –  eddi Dec 4 '13 at 18:45
    
Great! Thanks @Justin, this is what I was looking for. The "trick", so to speak, is using with=F twice... Please add the trailing ]. I tried, but SO would not let me. –  jlhoward Dec 4 '13 at 18:45
    
It's already there. @eddi It is almost what the OP has, but mine works :) –  Justin Dec 4 '13 at 18:47
2  
I guess I missed the point of OP, since this seems just as complicated to me as the names option in OP, which also works btw. –  eddi Dec 4 '13 at 18:49

Perhaps a for loop would look better?

for (i in 1:3) dt[[i]] = dt[[i+3]]
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3  
This'll make a copy. Use set. for (i in 1:3) set(dt, i=NULL, j=i, value=dt[[i+3]]). –  Arun Dec 4 '13 at 18:48
1  
@Arun sure but I thought the goal of OP was simplicity, not efficiency –  eddi Dec 4 '13 at 18:50
3  
My take was "simple" without losing the advantages of using a data.table. Otherwise, why use "data.table" in the first place..? –  Arun Dec 4 '13 at 18:51
    
I can come up with many many reasons for that "why" :) Anyway, looks like OP got what they wanted. –  eddi Dec 4 '13 at 18:52
    
@Arun's take is correct. I accept that data tables require named columns unless you include with=F, and that using := is preferred so the table is not copied. I was surprised, though, by the fact that dt[,1:3,with=F] on the LHS is not allowed. This seems very counter intuitive. Basically, I tried everything except using with=F twice. Figures... –  jlhoward Dec 4 '13 at 19:05

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