Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ultimately I want to travel through a folder's files and subdirectories and write something to all files i find that have a certain extension(.wav in my case). when looping how do i tell if the item I am at is a directory?

share|improve this question
    
Traversing directories is OS-dependent, so you probably need to tell us what OS you're using. There are some OS-independent libraries. If you're using one of them, we'll need to know which to give a good answer. –  Jerry Coffin Jan 10 '10 at 22:34
    
Is this a UNIX-y platform (Mac, etc) or Windows, or something else entirely? Many platforms will support the POSIX standards (robot.mbhs.edu/wordpress/2009/…), but will also generally have their own way of doing this, esp Windows (FindFirstFile/FindNextFile) –  Ben Zotto Jan 10 '10 at 22:34
    
I'm still not getting this to work how I want. FindFirstFile is outputting the name of the directory that I'm in, not the first file in the directory if i leave off the trailing /. If I do put the trailing / its giving me a weird file name (aaaaa-LIBVC...). Also, both times FindNextFile wont return any value at all –  pmilb Jan 11 '10 at 1:45

5 Answers 5

Here is how you do it (this is all from memory so there may be errors):

void FindFilesRecursively(LPCTSTR lpFolder, LPCTSTR lpFilePattern)
{
    TCHAR szFullPattern[MAX_PATH];
    WIN32_FIND_DATA FindFileData;
    HANDLE hFindFile;
    // first we are going to process any subdirectories
    PathCombine(szFullPattern, lpFolder, _T("*"));
    hFindFile = FindFirstFile(szFullPattern, &FindFileData);
    if(hFindFile != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
    {
        do
        {
            if(FindFileData.dwFileAttributes & FILE_ATTRIBUTE_DIRECTORY)
            {
                // found a subdirectory; recurse into it
                PathCombine(szFullPattern, lpFolder, FindFileData.cFileName);
                FindFilesRecursively(szFullPattern, lpPattern);
            }
        } while(FindNextFile(hFindFile, &FindFileData));
        FindClose(hFindFile);
    }
    // now we are going to look for the matching files
    PathCombine(szFullPattern, lpFolder, lpFilePattern);
    hFindFile = FindFirstFile(szFullPattern, &FindFileData);
    if(hFindFile != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
    {
        do
        {
            if(!(FindFileData.dwFileAttributes & FILE_ATTRIBUTE_DIRECTORY))
            {
                // found a file; do something with it
                PathCombine(szFullPattern, lpFolder, FindFileData.cFileName);
                _tprintf_s(_T("%s\n"), szFullPattern);
            }
        } while(FindNextFile(hFindFile, &FindFileData));
        FindClose(hFindFile);
    }
}

So you could call this like

FindFilesRecursively(_T("C:\\WINDOWS"), _T("*.wav"));

to find all the *.wav files in C:\WINDOWS and its subdirectories.

Technically you don't have to do two FindFirstFile() calls, but I find the pattern matching functions Microsoft provides (i.e. PathMatchFileSpec or whatever) aren't as capable as FindFirstFile(). Though for "*.wav" it would probably be fine.

share|improve this answer
    
@Luke- Great function. –  Abhineet Sep 13 '12 at 10:26
    
Thanks! Besides a couple of minor typeos it works great. –  Neilw Jan 12 '13 at 19:08

Based on your mention of .wav, I'm going to guess you're writing code for Windows (that seems to be where *.wav files are most common). In this case, you use FindFirstFile and FindNextFile to traverse directories. These use a WIN32_FIND_DATA structure, which has a member dwFileAttributes that contains flags telling the attributes of the file. If dwAttributes & FILE_ATTRIBUTE_DIRECTORY is non-zero, you have the name of a directory.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I'm doing this on Windows. My C is really rusty, haven't programmed in C for a few years. I was trying to use dirent.h, but I dont think it offers any way of telling if the item is a directory or not. Can't find a good example of FindFirstFile from google –  pmilb Jan 10 '10 at 22:46
    
This page shows how to use them (in VB, but translation to C should be more or less straight forward): support.microsoft.com/kb/185476. Note that you might also want to think about how you hande NTFS junctions, i.e. whether to follow them or not, and if you do how to avoid endless loops. –  Carsten Jan 10 '10 at 22:47

opendir and readdir (on unix), here's an example:

http://opengroup.org/onlinepubs/007908775/xsh/readdir.html

or FindFirstFile on windows

you could also use the shell pretty easily:

find . -name "*.wav"

or

ls **/*.wav    (in zsh and newer bashes)
share|improve this answer
    
oops, forgot to say I'm doing this on windoze also. –  pmilb Jan 10 '10 at 22:36

Very Helpful. I had anyway, a stack overflow since it was always adding "." to the path and returning to the same path = endless loop.

Adding this solved it:

// found a subdirectory; recurse into it PathCombine(szFullPattern, lpFolder, FindFileData.cFileName); FindFilesRecursively(szFullPattern, lpPattern); if (FindFileData.cFileName[0] == '.') continue;

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.