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Using the .NET MicroFramework which is a really cut-down version of C#. For instance, System.String barely has any of the goodies that we've enjoyed over the years.

I need to split a text document into lines, which means splitting by \r\n. However, String.Split only provides a split by char, not by string.

How can I split a document into lines in an efficient manner (e.g. not looping madly across each char in the doc)?

P.S. System.String is also missing a Replace method, so that won't work.
P.P.S. Regex is not part of the MicroFramework either.

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5  
It's not a cut-down version of C#; it's a cut-down version of the .NET Framework. –  Fredrik Mörk Jan 10 '10 at 22:43
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5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can do

string[] lines = doc.Split('\n');
for (int i = 0; i < lines.Length; i+= 1)
   lines[i] = lines[i].Trim();

Assuming that the µF supports Trim() at all. Trim() will remove all whitespace, that might be useful. Otherwise use TrimEnd('\r')

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Yep, this does the trick and keeps most of the performance characteristics. Thanks. Pretty clever. –  AngryHacker Jan 10 '10 at 23:05
    
I was just about to suggest something like this - beat me to the punch. You may need to recombine strings (theoretically) if '\n' is not always preceded by '\r' in the input. –  LBushkin Jan 10 '10 at 23:13
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I would loop across each char in the document, because that's clearly required. How do you think String.Split works? I would try to do so only hitting each character once, however.

Keep a list of strings found so far. Use IndexOf repeatedly, passing in the current offset into the string (i.e. the previous match + 2).

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True, but the full .NET implementation of Split(string[]) uses pointers and unsafe code to achieve the performance that it does. Otherwise, I would simply copy the code. I am operating on a really low end chip and was hoping for something exceedingly clever. –  AngryHacker Jan 10 '10 at 22:57
1  
If you're only splitting by a single delimiter string, and the delimiter is longer than 3 character, you can get better performance using one of the Boyer-Moore search algorithm variants. Not that it helps the poster's problem, in this case. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  LBushkin Jan 10 '10 at 23:09
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How can I split a document into lines in an efficient manner (e.g. not looping madly across each char in the doc)?

How do you think the built-in Split works?

Just reimplement it yourself as an extension method.

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What about:

string path = "yourfile.txt";
string[] lines = File.ReadAllLines(path);

Or

string content = File.ReadAllText(path);
string[] lines = content.Split(
    Environment.NewLine.ToCharArray(),
    StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

Readind that .NET Micro Framework 3.0, this code can work:

string line = String.Empty;
StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(path);
while ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
{
    // do stuff
}
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It splits by both items in the CharArray separately. Thus, you'd get a bunch of empty results in addition to legit results. –  AngryHacker Jan 10 '10 at 22:43
    
@AngryHacker: RemoveEmptyEntries should deal with them; –  Rubens Farias Jan 10 '10 at 22:54
    
File.ReadAllLines is not supported either. –  AngryHacker Jan 10 '10 at 22:58
    
See the link the provided in the question for documentation on what's supported. –  AngryHacker Jan 10 '10 at 23:00
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This may help in some scenario:

StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(file);    
string _Line = reader.ReadToEnd();
string IntMediateLine = string.Empty;
IntMediateLine = _Line.Replace("entersign", "");
string[] ArrayLineSpliter = IntMediateLine.Split('any specail chaarater');
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In what scenarios? Can you provide some details please. –  Austin Henley Sep 23 '12 at 3:16
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