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We have a template like such:

<xsl:template name = "MyTemplate">
    <!-- do some stuff-->
    <xsl:apply-templates select = "Node"/>
</xsl:template>

We call this with

<xsl:call-template name="MyTemplate"/>

Now we're going to refactor this, so that that inner apply template isn't necessarily applied every time the template is called. We want decide whether it should be applied when we call the outer template.

However, we don't want to (or disagree with me on this point) go through and refactor every existing call of the outer template, rather we should only refactor the existing uses where we want the functionality to change.

There's a few ways we can do this:

Firstly, we can use either an XSLT boolean, or a string to determine whether it should run or not.

Boolean:

<xsl:template name = "MyTemplate">
    <xsl:param name="UseNode" select = "true()"/>
    <!-- do some stuff-->

    <xsl:if test="$UseNode = true()">
        <xsl:apply-templates select = "Node"/>
    </xsl:if>
</xsl:template>

String:

<xsl:template name = "MyTemplate">
    <xsl:param name="UseNode" select = 'true'/>
    <!-- do some stuff-->

    <xsl:if test="$UseNode = 'true'">
        <xsl:apply-templates select = "Node"/>
    </xsl:if>
</xsl:template>

Secondly, we can either set it to suppress using a parameter, or use using the parameter.

Use:

<xsl:template name = "MyTemplate">
    <xsl:param name="UseNode" select = "true()"/>
    <!-- do some stuff-->

    <xsl:if test="$UseNode = true()">
        <xsl:apply-templates select = "Node"/>
    </xsl:if>
</xsl:template>

Use the node:

<xsl:call-template name="MyTemplate"/> 

Don't use the node:

<xsl:call-template name="MyTemplates">
    <xsl:with-param name="UseNode" select = "false()"/>
</xsl:call-template>

Suppress:

<xsl:template name = "MyTemplate">
    <xsl:param name="SuppressNode" select = "false()"/>
    <!-- do some stuff-->

    <xsl:if test="$SuppressNode = false()">
        <xsl:apply-templates select = "Node"/>
    </xsl:if>
</xsl:template>

Use the node:

<xsl:call-template name="MyTemplate"/> 

Don't use the node:

<xsl:call-template name="MyTemplates">
    <xsl:with-param name="SuppressNode" select = "true()"/>
</xsl:call-template>

What's the best way to refactor this template, and why?

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nb. haven't tested this code yet - not sure if those booleans work :) –  dwjohnston Dec 5 '13 at 1:09
    
Perhaps you should test your code. If you don't know if it works or not, how do you know its wrong? –  Lego Stormtroopr Dec 5 '13 at 4:21
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You've outlined the options quite well; they will all work. Except in very unusual cases I would expect them all to be indistinguishable in practice (David Carlisle is right that pushing compile-time choices into run-time has a cost, but I would expect that cost to be imperceptible most of the time, so I wouldn't worry about it unless I had to).

Which is best?

The one that will make it easiest for the poor sucker who ends up reading this code three months from now trying to fix a bug or extend the functionality of the stylesheet. You are probably the best judge of that, in context.

(For what it's worth, though: I usually use the strings 'yes' and 'no' in these cases, since those are the way XSLT itself does Booleans; others clearly prefer real Booleans, for the reasons David Carlisle has already explained. And on average, I find parameters like SuppressNode, with negation built into the name, 8.32% more likely to confuse me and make me stop to puzzle out the correct polarity, than parameters with a positive meaning like UseNode. So if it were me, I would probably start with a UseNode parameter defaulting to yes. But then I'd read David Carlisle's answer and change to two templates named MyTemplate and MyTemplate-SuppressNode, since a call-template is one line in the caller, and a call-template with parameters is three.)

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I've given the checkmark to this answer, as it more closely addresses the issue which is refactoring. –  dwjohnston Dec 8 '13 at 20:26
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You don't need

  <xsl:if test="$UseNode = true()">

simply

  <xsl:if test="$UseNode">

if UseNode is (or can be cast to) a boolean value.

Similarly $SuppressNode = false()" is not($SuppressNode)

But probably I'd use a simpler scheme and have two templates rather than a run time switch.

<xsl:template name = "MyTemplate1">
    <!-- do some stuff-->
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template name = "MyTemplate2">
    <xsl:call-template name="MyTemplate1"/>
    <xsl:apply-templates select = "Node"/>
</xsl:template>

Then you can just call MyTemplate1 or MyTemplate2 depending. Unless of course in your real case you have multiple parameters and many different combinations of values, in which case you'd need many named templates rather than a parametrised one, which would not be so convenient.

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Re: your second point. Yes, in the future there might be several such nodes that you're wanting to either turn on or off. –  dwjohnston Dec 5 '13 at 1:26
    
@dwjohnston hard to say without context but in at least some of your parameter options you may be expressing what is a compile time choice into a run-time test which has some costs unless your system optimises it away, but perhaps it's just a small example and really you need run time decision anyway and the values of your parameters depend on the input data (in which case you definitely don't want separate named templates) –  David Carlisle Dec 5 '13 at 1:42
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